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Full text of "Employment and employee compensation in the 1967 input-output study / by Peter E. Coughlin"

BEA-SP 78-031 



Employment and Employee Compensation 

in the 1967 Input-Output Study 



Bureau of Economic Analysis Staff Paper No. 31 




February 1978 






/ 






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U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE 

BUREAU OF ECONOMIC ANALYSIS 



a 

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BEA Staff Paper No. 31 BEA-SP 78-031 



Employment and Employee 
Compensation in the 1967 
Input-Output Study 



by 

Peter E. Coughlin 



,.«■ ««. 



/ V \ 

il i February 1978 

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE 
Juanita M. Kreps, Secretary 

BUREAU OF ECONOMIC ANALYSIS 

George Jaszi, Director 

Allan H. Young, Deputy Director 



PREFACE 

Staff papers present reports on BEA research that is more specialized or less 
well established than BEA research generally made available to the public. 

The work for this paper was performed in the Interindustry Economics Division 
under the guidance of Philip M. Ritz, Chief, and Albert J. Walderhaug, Chief of 
the Research and Analysis Branch. The report was prepared by Peter E. Coughlin. 
Important assistance was provided by Howard L. Schreier. Camera-ready copy was 
prepared by Peggy L. Burcham of the Interindustry Economics Division and by Billy 
Jo Hurley and her staff in the Current Business Analysis Division. 



BIBLIOGRAPHIC DATA 
SHEET 



1 . Report No. 

BEA-SP 78-031 



3. Recipient's Accession No. 



4. Title and Subtitle 



5. Report Date 



Employment and Employee Compensation in the 
1967 Input-Output Study 



February 1978 



7. Author(s) 



Peter E. Cough! in 



8. Performing O r g a n 1 7. a 1 -ft. 

3 Sta ff Pap er N o, 31 



9. Performing Organization Name and Address 

Bureau of Economic Analysis 
U.S. Department of Commerce 
Washington, D.C. 20230 



10. Proiec: Task Work I nil No. 



11. ( ontrac: dram Ni 



12. Sponsoring Organization Name and Address 

Bureau of Economic Analysis 
U.S. Department of Commerce 
Washington, D.C. 20230 



13. Type of Report & Period 
Covered 

Staff Paper 



u. 



15. Supplementary Note; 



16. Abstracts 

Provides 1967 employment, employee compensation, and wages and salaries for all 
employees and employment, worker hours, and wages for production workers by industries 
as defined for the 1967 input-output tables. Estimates are shown at the 85- and 367- 
industry levels, based on aggregation of estimates prepared at the 484-industry level 
(available upon request). Included are the estimating methodology, a reconciliation 
with the national income and product account estimates, and an evaluation of the 
accuracy of the estimates. 



17. Key Words and Document Analysis. 17a. Descriptors 

Full- and part-time workers 

Production workers 

Self-employed and unpaid family workers (excluded from employment) 

Employee compensation 

Wages and salaries; payroll 

Force account construction; manufacturers' sales offices 

Central administrative offices; redefinitions 

Input-output tables. 



1 7b. Identifiers/Open-F.nded Terms 



17c. COSATI Field Group 



18. Availability Statement 

National Technical Information Service 
5285 Port Royal Road 
Springfield, Virginia 22161 



FORM NTIS-33 IREV. 10-731 ENDORSED [IV ANSI AND I \l sto. 



19. Scvurity (lass (Thi 
Report ) 

IN' I.ASSIHEE 



20. Security C lass ( lb is 
Page 

UNCLASSIFIED 



IHIS rOKM MAY HI- KH'KOIH !( FD 



21. No. ot P 



!2. !' 



USCOMM-DC S2A3- p 74 



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EMPLOYMENT AND EMPLOYEE COMPENSATION IN THE 1967 INPUT-OUTPUT STUDY 

OUTLINE Page 

Introduction 

Choice of Employment Measure 

Methodology 

Agriculture, forestry, and fisheries 

Mining and manufacturing 

Central administrative office adjustments in manufacturing 

Redefinitions in mining and manufacturing 

Construction 

Transportation 

Communications and utilities 

Trade 

Finance, insurance, and real estate 

Services 

Government enterprises, government industry and rest of the world 

Presentation of the Detailed Industry Estimates 

Detailed reconciliation of NIPA and 1-0 data on employment and employee 
compensation ■ 

Evaluation of the Industry Estimates 

Employee compensation compared with value added 

TABLES 

Text tables 

1 Reconciliation of NIPA and 1-0 Employment and Employee Compensation, 

1967 -— — 4 

2 Comparison of Census Bureau and NIPA Employment and Wages and 

Salaries, 1967 6 

3 Employment, Compensation, and Related Measures, by 85-Industry 

1-0 Detail, 1967 — 13 

Appendix tables 

1 Industry Classification of the 1967 Input-Output Tables 18 

2 Employment, Employee Compensation, and Related Measures, 

by 1-0 Group, 1967 — 23 

3 Reconciliation of National Income and Product (NIPA) and 

Input-Output (1-0) Employment, by Industry, 1967 24 

4 Reconciliation of National Income and Product (NIPA) and 

Input-Output (1-0) Employee Compensation, by Industry, 1967 28 

5 Employment, Compensation, and Related Measures, by 367-Industry 

1-0 Detail, 1967 33 

6 Agricultural Labor Distribution by 1-0 Industry, 1967 38 

7 Redefinitions Other Than Force Account Construction and 

Manufacturers' Sales Offices, at the 367-Industry 1-0 Level, 

1967 - — - 39 



EMPLOYMENT AND EMPLOYEE COMPENSATION IN THE 1967 INPUT-OUTPUT STUDY 

INTRODUCTION 

This report presents estimates, by industry, of employment and compensation of all 
employees, and of employment, wages, and hours of production workers in manufacturing 
and mining consistent with the classifications and definitions used for the Bureau of 
Economic Analysis (BEA) input-output (1-0) table for 1967. 1/ The estimates can be 
used to extend the 1-0 analysis of the impact of stipulated final demand on industry 
output to include the impact on employment, hours, and payrolls. 

The estimates in this report differ slightly from the employee compensation estimates 
published with the revised 1967 table in BEA Staff Paper No. 29. The differences result 
from some new data and new methodology. The current estimates were made at the 484- 
industry 1-0 level and are available on request to the Interindustry Economics Division 
(IED) of BEA. The estimates shown in this report have been aggregated to the 85- and 
367-industry levels, in table 3 and Appendix Table 5, respectively. Estimates by broad 
1-0 industry groups are shown in Appendix Table 2. 

Three earlier studies contain employment estimates for 1967 in 1-0 industry detail. 2/ 
However, two were developed before publication of BEA's 1967 1-0 table and none reflects 
the revised NIPA's published in 1976. Further, none is fully consistent with the defini- 
tions used in BEA's published 1-0 table. 



1. The estimates are consistent with the 1967 1-0 table revised to reflect the benchmark 
revision of the national income and product accounts (NIPA's) published in January 1976. 

The NIPA revisions are described in the January 1976 SURVEY OF CURRENT BUSINESS, 

parts I and II, The National Income and Product Accounts of the United States: Revised 
Estimates 1929-74; the July 1976 SURVEY, and The National Income and Product Accounts of 
the United States, 1929-74: Statistical Tables, a Supplement to the SURVEY. 

The revised 1-0 tables appear in BEA Staff Paper No. 29, Revised input-output Tables 
for the united states: 1967, BEA-SP 77-029. Single copies are available from the Inter- 
industry Economics Division (IED), BEA. Additional copies may be purchased from the 
National Technical Information Service (NTIS), Springfield, Virginia 22161, for $5.25 each 
($3.00 microfiche). The accession number is PB-270-259/AS. 

2. These Studies are: The Structure of the U.S. Economy in 1980 and 1985, Bulletin 1831, 

Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), U.S. Department of Labor, 1975, Appendix C; Roger Bezdek, 

ejt al_, Derivation of the 1963 and 1967 Total Employment Vector for 367 1-0 Sectors, CAC 

Document No. 63, Center for Advanced Computation, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois, 

April 1973; and Deane Merrill, U.S. Employment for 368 Input-Output Sectors for 1963, 1967, 

and 1972, prepared for the Energy Research and Development Administration under Contract 
W-7405-ENG-48, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, California, 
June 1975. 



- 1 - 



CHOICE OF EMPLOYMENT MEASURE 

Since the 1-0 tables are integrated statistically and conceptually with the NIPA's, the 
employment and related measures shown in this report are based on the corresponding NIPA 
measures. The NIPA measures are derived from data from the unemployment insurance (UI) 
employment statistics program. 3/ For use in the NIPA's, the UI employment data are 
adjusted to include groups excluded from UI coverage—employees of small firms, nonprofit 
and charitable institutions, railroads, and government—and to exclude U.S. private 
workers regularly employed abroad. 

The employment and related measures do not include the self-employed or unpaid family 
workers. Estimates of unpaid family workers are incomplete and unreliable in total and 
by industry. For the self-employed, it was considered essential that the employment 
estimates match the estimates of compensation of employees. However, estimates of the 
compensation component of the earnings of the self-employed are not available and hence 
the number of self-employed is not included. Estimates of self-employed persons by broad 
industry groupings are available upon request to the National Income and Wealth Division 
(NIWD) of BEA. 

As will be seen in the discussion of the methodology which follows, data from the UI series, 
from the economic censuses, and from the Census Bureau's county Business Patterns are used 
to derive the detailed 1-0 industry estimates. 

METHODOLOGY 

Several steps are required to adapt the NIPA estimates of compensation of employees and 
the number of full- and part-time employees by industry to 1-0 requirements. The first 
step is to derive additional detail to match the 1-0 classification. The NIPA detail 
shows 63 industries at generally the 2-digit Standard Industrial Classification (SIC), 
whereas the finest detail in the 1-0 industry classification is 484 industries. The 484- 
industry detail includes 49 types of construction, nearly all of the 4-digit SIC industries 
in manufacturing, and 17 agricultural industries. 

The second step is to eliminate statistical differences in the data from which the NIPA 
and 1-0 tables are derived. The statistical differences between the economic censuses 
and the UI data stem mostly from differences in the industry classification of establishments 
As noted, the latter are the basis for the NIPA estimates and the former are largely the 
basis for the 1-0 tables. However, differences between the Census and NIPA estimates are 
relatively small for major industry divisions. The adjustments which were made to resolve 
these statistical differences are identified as NIPA - 1-0 adjustments in table 1 and 
Appendix Tables 3 and 4. 



3. Employment and wages, Fourth Quarter and Annual, 1967, Manpower Administration, 
U.S. Department of Labor. This is now published by BLS. The UI data cover full- and 
part-time workers and exclude the self-employed and unpaid family workers, 

- 2 - 



The third step is the reclassification of establishments that appear in one industry in 
the NIPA's but in a different industry in 1-0. For example, establishments engaged in 
the sale of trading stamp services (SIC 7396) are moved from NIPA's miscellaneous business 
services (SIC 73) to trade (1-0 69). 

The final step is similar to reclassification in that it involves a redefinition of an 
activity within an establishment from one industry to another to achieve a more homogeneous 
input structure. In this process, the output of the activity being redefined and the 
associated inputs, including employee compensation and the other components of value 
added, are shifted from one industry to another. There are two types of redefinitions 
which affect many or most of the 1-0 industries. Force account construction (FAC)--new 
and maintenance and repair construction performed by employees of a nonconstruction 
establishment for its own account—has been redefined into the 1-0 construction industry. 
This type of redefinition affects virtually all producing industries. Similarly, manu- 
facturers' sales offices (MSO's) are redefined from wholesale trade into the 1-0 manu- 
facturing industry which they serve. 

Other redefinitions usually involve only pairs of industries. For example, alumina was 
shifted from industrial inorganic and organic chemicals (1-0 27.01) to primary aluminum 
(1-0 38.04). These specific redefinitions are made for activities within establishments 
for which either the pattern of sales or the input structure is more similar to that for 
another industry than the one in which the establishment is originally classified. These 
redefinitions are shown in Appendix Table 7. 

Table 1 shows the effect of the adjustments described above, by major industry groups, and 
serves as the focus of the following discussion of the procedures used in deriving the 
more detailed 1-0 estimates. Appendix Tables 3 and 4 show the same information at the 
85-industry 1-0 classification. 

Agriculture, forestry and fisheries 

In developing the detailed employment and compensation estimates for this major industrial 
division, NIPA data for employment and compensation serve as the initial controls in total 
and for the two main components: farms, which include livestock and products (1-0 1) and 
other agricultural products (1-0 2); and agricultural services, forestry and fisheries, 
which include forestry and fisheries (1-0 3) and agricultural services (1-0 4). 

The agricultural portion of the 1-0 tables was prepared in large part by the Economic 
Research Service (ERS) of the U.S. Department of Agriculture. The most detailed 1-0 
table (at the 484-industry level) shows 17 farm industries, for which employment estimates 
for full- and part-time workers were distributed by BEA among the industries in proportion 
to estimates of employee hours of hired labor prepared by ERS in the same detail. (See 
Appendix Table 6.) Employee compensation was prorated using the ERS estimates of wages 
paid to hired labor, assuming that the ratio of wage supplements to wages was the same in 
each of the agricultural industries. The split of agricultural services, forestry and 
fisheries into forestry and fisheries (1-0 3) and agricultural services (1-0 4) was made 
using UI 3-digit SIC detail and unpublished BEA estimates. 

There are no NIPA - 1-0 adjustments in agriculture (1-0 1 and 2). However, the 1-0 table 
reclassifies the offices of veterinarians and animal hospitals (SIC 0722) from agricultural 
services (1-0 4) to other medical and health services (1-0 77.03). The amounts reclassified 
were estimated using detail available from UI data on employment and wages and salaries. 

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Redefinitions for FAC did not affect agriculture (1-0 1 and 2). Landscaping services 
were redefined into agricultural services (1-0 4) from construction (1-0 11 and 12) and 
from trade (1-0 69). (See Appendix Table 7.) 

Mining and manufacturing 

The NIPA - 1-0 adjustments of employment and compensation shown for mining and manufacturing 
in table 1 result from differences in the classification of establishments between the NIPA 
series based on UI data and the Census data used in the 1-0 study. The effects of these 
differences can be seen in table 2, which compares the two sets of data at the 2-digit 
SIC level of detail. The largest difference occurs in the petroleum and natural gas mining 
industry (SIC 13). However, when employment in this mining industry is combined with that 
in petroleum refining (SIC 29), the difference virtually disappears. 

(Thousands of employees) 
NIPA Census 

Sic 13 4/ 275.0 244.9 

SIC 29 4/ 180.0 210.8 

Total 455.0 455.7 

Similarly, there is a difference of nine thousand employees between NIPA and Census for 
metal mining (SIC 10) and there is a difference of seven thousand for coal mining (SIC 11 
+12), but there are no obvious offsets in related manufacturing industries. 

To arrive at the estimates in this report, BEA prorated the NIPA employment and wages and 
salaries totals for combined mining and manufacturing in proportion to the detailed Census 
employment and payroll estimates. This procedure was adopted due to differences in cover- 
age of nonproduction workers by the Census (as discussed below). It was assumed that any 
classification differences in mining and manufacturing between the Census and UI would 
impact minimally upon other industry divisions. The Census estimates which were used in- 
cluded the adjustments for Central Administrative Office (CAO) personnel described in the 
next section. Thus, all the Census industry employment totals were increased by 1.1 percent 
and all the Census industry wages and salaries totals were increased by 1.7 percent. (See 
table 2.) Since the mining and manufacturing portion of the 1-0 table for 1967 was based 
principally on these Censuses, the above procedure should yield employment and compensation 
estimates consistent with 1-0 industry inputs and outputs. 

The extent of the needed prorations is not quite as large as it may seem in using the 
figures shown in table 2. The NIPA figures should be looked at after adjustment for SIC 13 
and 29, as shown in the following table. Because the Census data already reflect this 
adjustment, the differences are actually much less, particularly for the mining industries. 



4. Includes central administrative offices. 

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Mining Manufacturing 

Wages and Wages and 

Employment salaries Employment salaries 

(thousands) (millions) (thousands) (millions) 

NIPA 613.0 $4,622.0 19,506.0 $134,108.0 

Adjustments for SIC 

13 and 29 -30.1 -266.9 30.1 266.9 

Adjusted NIPA 582.9 4,355.1 19,536.1 134,374.9 

Less: Census -567.3 -4,186.8 -19,322.9 -132,208.5 

Difference — 15.6 $ 1 68 . 3 213.2 $ 2,166.4 

Percentage difference — 2.7 4.0 1.1 1.6 

A portion of the apparent undercoverage in the Census employment data is due to the method 
for compiling the data. For production workers, the Census averages the number on the pay- 
roll during the pay period which includes the 12th of March, May, August, and November, 
whereas the statistic for "all other" employees is reported only for the period including 
the 12th of March. Thus, in a period of rising employment, the "all other" total would be 
understated. The UI total employment data, on the other hand, are averages of twelve 
monthly pay periods. The Census estimates of total wages and salaries are for the entire 
year. There is no information on why the Census payroll estimates are less than the NIPA 
estimates. 

While the agreement is close for mining and manufacturing as a whole, there are signifi- 
cant differences at the 2-digit SIC level. These can be attributed to differences in the 
classification of establishments in the two data sources. (See table 2.) UI data are 
obtained from the 50 State agencies and the District of Columbia by the Bureau of Employment 
Security of the U.S. Department of Labor. It is difficult to ensure that data collected by 
these 51 agencies will be consistent in uniformity and currency of classification of 
reporting establishments, whereas the Census data are compiled nationally under one set 
of rules. 

In order to arrive at employee compensation estimates for the detailed mining and manu- 
facturing industries, it was necessary to estimate supplements to wages and salaries. 5/ 
Supplements for mining industries were based on the NIPA ratio of supplements to wages 
and salaries at the 2-digit SIC level. In manufacturing, the estimates were made in two 
groups. (1) For tobacco manufactures (SIC 21) and petroleum and coal products (SIC 29), 
supplements were estimated separately due to underreporting of 1967 supplements in 
these industries in the Annual survey of Manufactures , 1969. The ratios of supplements 
to wages and salaries for each of these 2-digit industries were assumed to be equal 
to the NIPA ratios. The derived total supplements for SIC 21 and 29 (minus Census 
supplements for operating establishments and estimates of supplements in CAO's) were 
prorated among the corresponding 4-digit SIC industries, based on Census payroll data 
plus estimates of CA0 wages and salaries. Then Census and CA0 supplements were added 
back to obtain the final estimates. (2) For the remaining 1-0 manufacturing industries, 



5. Supplements to wages and salaries is the compensation of employees not commonly 
regarded as wages and salaries. It consists of employer contributions for social 
insurance; employer contributions to private pension, health, and welfare funds; com- 
pensation for injuries; death benefits; directors' fees; pay of the military reserve; 
and a few other minor items of labor income. 



supplements were estimated by prorating the NIPA supplements for manufacturing and 
mining (minus supplements estimated for mining and SIC 21 and 29) to the individual 
1-0 industries, using Census data on 1967 supplements shown in the Annual survey of 
Manufactures, 1969, pi us estimates of CAO supplements. The supplements for CAO 
workers were estimated by assuming the same ratios to wages and salaries as those for 
other workers. 

The procedure for adjusting employment and wages and salaries gave 2-digit estimates 
for mining industries. Detail from the census of Mineral industries, 1967 on employ- 
ment and payroll was used to break down the NIPA 2-digit information where finer 
classifications were necessary. 

Oil and gas field services (SIC 138) are part of mining in NIPA, but they are considered 
construction for 1-0 purposes and are, therefore, reclassified into the construction 
industry. This shifts 105.9 thousand employees and $771.6 million of compensation 
out of mining into construction. 

Central administrative offices are included in the mining industry data in the census 
of Mineral industries, 1967. However, CAO ' s are not included in the manufacturing 
industries in the census of Manufactures, 1967. Therefore, estimates for the latter 
CAO's were calculated, as follows. 

Central administrative office adjustments in manufacturing 

Except for a few industries, the industry detail for manufacturing in the 484-industry 
1-0 table is at the 4-digit Census of Manufactures level and is consistent with the 
industrial detail in the Census. However, information on employment and wages and 
salaries in CAO's of manufacturing establishments is available at only the 2-digit 
Census level. CAO's account for 4.2 percent of manufacturing employment and had to 
be distributed to the 1-0 industries which they serve. The Census of Manufactures 
data on employment and wages and salaries for CAO's at the 2-digit level were used 
as control totals for the distribution to the 4-digit level. This distribution was 
done in two stages. First, the 2-digit controls were prorated to approximately the 
3-digit SIC level using information available in the Bureau of the Census publication, 

1967 Enterprise Statistics , Part 3, Link of Census Establishment and Internal Revenue 

service Corporation Data, covering corporations whose major activity was in manufacturing 
In this source, the CAO employment and wages and salaries are classified by the principal 
industry served, according to the classification used by the IRS (sometimes 3-digit SIC 
and sometimes 4-digit SIC). Second, when further detail below these levels was needed, 
data from the census of Manufactures, 1967, Vol ume 1 on employment and payrolls for 
operating establishments of multi-unit companies were used to prorate the CAO estimates 
to the finer level . 

In 1967, the CAO's for ordnance (SIC 19) and miscellaneous manufacturing industries 
(SIC 39) were combined in the 2-digit Census data. In order to derive the CAO's 
associated with ordnance, it was first necessary to split the combined total. This was 

done by using related data from the Census of Manufactures, 1963. Next, Since Enterprise 

statistics does not show separate data on ordnance, it was necessary to prorate SIC 19 
CAO employment and payrolls across the census of Manufactures, 1967 4-digit operating 
establishment detail for ordnance. 



- 8 - 



Redefinitions in mining and manufacturing 

There are three classes of redefinitions: force account construction, manufacturers' 
sales offices, and other "specific" redefinitions. In all cases, the employment 
associated with the "specific" redefinitions was estimated by using the ratio of 
employment to compensation for the industry receiving the redefined output. This 
applied whether or not the redefinition affects industries outside of mining and 
manufacturing. 

There are no redefinitions into or out of mining other than FAC, which amount to 57.6 
thousand employees and $526 million of compensation. 

Redefinitions of MSO's into manufacturing amount to 193 thousand employees and $2,080 
million of compensation, or about one percent of the manufacturing total. The data 
on employment and wages and salaries for MSO's in the Census is given at the 4-digit 
SIC level for kind-of-business in wholesale trade (SIC 50). In assignment of employ- 
ment and wages and salaries to manufacturing industries, information on commodity-line 
sales by kind-of-business was used to identify the manufacturing classification of the 
MSO's. This is consistent with the treatment of manufacturing transactions in the 1-0 
table. 

The redefinitions of FAC out of manufacturing are relatively small --71 thousand employees 
and $543 million of compensation. The redefinitions are primarily to maintenance and 
repair construction (1-0 12). 

The specific redefinitions-out of manufacturing are mainly installation work to new 
construction (1-0 11), while redefinitions-in to manufacturing are largely the miscella- 
neous manufacturing activities performed in trade (1-0 69). The detail for these and the 
other minor redefinitions affecting manufacturing is shown in Appendix Table 7. 

Construction 

The 1-0 table contains estimates for 49 types of new and maintenance and repair con- 
struction, consisting of both contract construction and FAC. These measures provided 
estimates of total wages and salaries paid to contract construction employees. Total 
wages and salaries were divided by estimates of wages and salaries per employee, developed 
for the current study, to arrive at estimates of contract construction employment. 

Wages and salaries per employee were calculated in several steps. Based on a BLS study 6/, 
the 49 1-0 construction types were classified into low-wage and high-wage categories. 
For the low-wage category, the average hourly rate for construction workers for 1969 

was assumed to be equal to the hourly rate Shown in BLS's Labor and Material Requirements 
for Construction of Private Single-Family Houses, Bulletin 1744. This rate was extra- 
polated to 1967 by the movement in the BLS measure of average hourly earnings of 
construction workers in the general building contractors industry. 7/ The 1967 hourly 



6. Labor and Material Requirements for Construction of Private Single-Family Houses, 

BLS, 1972, Bulletin 1755, page 8. 

7. Construction Review, U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Domestic Commerce, 
Volume 20, number 2, March 1974, table G.4, page 59. For average hours per week, see 
page 60. 

- 9 - 



rate was converted to an estimate of annual wages and salaries per employee (amounting 
to $6,180) on the assumption of 36.5 hours per week and 50 weeks per year. To calculate 
employment by type of low-wage construction, this annual estimate per employee was 
divided into the annual total of wages and salaries for the following types of contract 
construction: residential single-family housing, residential additions and alterations, 
farm residential buildings, and farm service facilities. The estimate of wages and 
salaries and of employment for the low-wage category in total was subtracted from the 
NIPA estimate for the total contract construction industry to derive the corresponding 
estimate for the high-wage contract construction activities. From these residuals, the 
annual wage and salary estimate per employee was calculated ($8,307) and divided into 
the 1-0 wage and salary estimates for each of the high-wage types of contract construction, 
to derive the contract employment estimates. 

One NIPA - 1-0 adjustment is required. The UI data upon which NIPA estimates are based 
include telephone installation workers in construction. The 1-0 table includes the out- 
put of these workers and their compensation in the communication industry (SIC 48). 
Therefore, 26.5 thousand employees and $342.7 million in employee compensation were shifted 
from construction to the communication industry. 

The redefinition of FAC added 1,102 thousand employees and $9,663 million of employee 
compensation to the 1-0 construction industry. In making the redefinitions, the same 
high and low wages and salaries per employee rates were divided into the estimates of 
FAC wages and salaries to be shifted from each industry to determine how many employees 
should also be moved. If the FAC was being sent to low paying construction industries 
(e.g., single-family residential housing), the low annual wages and salaries per employee 
rate was used; otherwise, the high rate was used. Supplements were assumed to be in the 
same proportion to employee compensation as in the industry sending the FAC to construction 
Since the shifting of FAC employment and compensation was such a large proportion of the 
total 1-0 construction industry (about one-fourth of the total industry) and because of 
the rough assumptions used to calculate FAC employment, the accuracy of the resulting 
numbers .in construction is uncertain. 8/ 

Specific activities redefined out of construction reduce employment and employee compensa- 
tion by 136 thousand and $754 million, respectively. Specific redefinitions into con- 
struction provided increases of 53 thousand employees and $441 million in compensation. 
(See Appendix Table 7.) 

Transportation 

Few changes to the NIPA 2-digit estimates were required to adapt them to match the 1-0 
table. It was necessary only to break down transportation services (SIC 47) to obtain 
detail for stockyards (SIC 473) and rental of railroad cars (SIC 474) and assign them to 
motor freight transportation and warehousing (1-0 65.03) and railroads and related services 
(1-0 65.01), respectively. Data on wages and salaries covered in the UI program 9/ were 
used to prorate the NIPA employment and compensation figures for SIC 47 to SIC 473 and 474. 



8. See section on Evaluation of the Industry Estimates 

9. Employment and Wages, 1967, op. cit. 



- 10 - 



About four percent of employment and employee compensation has been redefined into new 
and maintenance construction. The percentage is greater than for most industries because 
of large investment in structures, particularly in the railroad and pipeline industries. 

A specific redefinition from transportation to manufacturing is the employment and com- 
pensation associated with building and rebuilding railroad equipment in company-owned 
shops. In addition, there is a redefinition associated with merchandise sales, from 
the warehousing industry to trade. Redefinitions to transportation from trade reflect 
the public warehousing activity that occurs in wholesale trade and the service activities 
of marinas in retail trade. (See Appendix Table 7.) 

Communications and utilities 

The NIPA classification for communications is the same as for the 1-0 industries. The 
NIPA - 1-0 adjustments of 26.5 thousand employees and $342.7 million in compensation 
are due to shifting certain telephone installation workers from construction to the 
communication industry. See the above discussion of this shift in the section on 
construction. 

The NIPA and 1-0 classifications are consistent for the utility industries as a whole. 
To provide the breakdown of the NIPA utilities data into electric utilities, gas utilities, 
and water and sanitary services, as defined in the 1-0 classification, detailed UI data 
for SIC 49 was used. It was further necessary to break down combination companies (SIC 
493) into components that match the 1-0 classification. For this purpose, information 
reported to the Federal Power Commission by the combination companies was used. 

The redefinition of FAC involved 154 thousand employees and $1,147 million of compensation-- 
about 10 percent of the total. Similar to transportation, force account employment is 
a larger percentage of total communications and utilities employment than in most 
industries because of the large fixed investment in structures. There are no specific 
redefinitions into or out of these industries. 

Trade 

The NIPA classification is consistent with that used for the 1-0 study and the estimates 
of employment and compensation are based on coverage which is more complete than the 
data reported to the Census; hence, no additional detail had to be estimated. The classi- 
fication change shown in table 2 reflects the reclassification of trading stamp companies 
(SIC 7396) from business services into retail trade. The redefinition of MSO's out of 
trade was discussed above in the section on manufacturing. FAC redefinitions are very 
small . 

Specific redefinitions of employment and compensation out of trade are mainly services 
performed in wholesale and retail establishments and some minor manufacturing activities. 
Redefinitions to trade are the employment and compensation associated with merchandise 
sales that occur mainly in service establishments. 

Finance, insurance, and real estate 

The NIPA classification is consistent with that used in the 1-0 study, so that no additional 
detail needed to be estimated. Redefinitions for FAC reduced employment in these in- 
dustries by 212 thousand and compensation by $1,604 million, virtually all of which was 



- 11 - 



in the real estate and rental industry, 1-0 71. (See Appendix Tables 3 and 4.) The 
specific redefintions into and out of these industries are minor. (See Appendix Table 

7 - ) 

Services 

Except as noted below, the NIPA classification is consistent with the 1-0 classification; 
hence, the NIPA figures for the service group are used as controls for allocation of 
employment and compensation to the individual 1-0 industries. The NIPA figures were 
used rather than the separate industry estimates of employment and payrolls from the 
1967 census of Selected services, because there was strong evidence of undercoverage 
in this Census. Furthermore, the Census did not cover all the service industries defined 
in the 1-0 table nor the total output of some services as defined for 1-0 purposes. 
Where additional detail was required for the 1-0 classification or reclassification, 
proportions developed from UI data and from county Business Patterns were used to break 
down the NIPA totals. The classification change shown in table 2 is the net result of 
two reclassifications: animal husbandry services (SIC 0722) reclassified out of agri- 
culture into services and trading stamp services (SIC 7396) reclassified into trade 
from business services. FAC redefinitions are relatively small. The specific redefini- 
tions out of service industries are mainly to trade and to other service industries, 
and conversely, redefinitions to services are also from trade and from other service 
industries. (See Appendix Table 7.) 

Government enterprises, government industry, and rest of the world 

The 1-0 figures for employment and compensation agree in total with the published NIPA 
figures, except for the differences due to the redefinition of FAC. The additional 1-0 
detail shown for Federal and State and local government purchases is available in unpub- 
lished form from the NIPA's. 

PRESENTATION OF THE DETAILED INDUSTRY ESTIMATES 

The 1-0 estimates of employment, compensation, and related measures are shown at the 85- 
industry level in table 3. Appendix Table 5 shows the estimates at the 367-industry level. 
Estimates at the 484-industry level are available upon request to IED. The related 
measures include wages and salaries and supplements, which were derived in the same way 
as the employee compensation data and are consistent with the published NIPA data at the 
2-digit SIC level. In addition, table 3 and Appendix Table 5 contain information for the 
mining and manufacturing industries on production worker employment, wages and salaries, 

and hours, based On data in the 1967 Censuses of Manufactures and Mineral Industries. 

Production worker employment, hours, and wages were estimated for the 1-0 industries by 
making the same industry adjustments as those made for calculating the total employment 
and compensation estimates. However, they were not adjusted upward as were the all -employee 
estimates, because there are no NIPA controls for production workers. 

The only reclassification that affected production worker estimates was that which moved 
oil and gas field services (SIC 138) from mining to construction. The Census production 
worker data for SIC 138 were removed from mining and reclassified into construction as 
construction workers. 



- 12 - 






Table 3. --Employment, Compensation, and Related Measures, 
by 85-Industry 1-0 Detail, 1967 





Al" employees 


Production wort 




Industry 


Employ- 
ment 


Compen- 
sation 


Wages and 
salaries 


Supple- 
ments 


cers* 


number 


Number 


Hours 


Wages 




(000) 


(mil.$) 


(mil.$) 


(mil.$) 


(000) 


(mil.) 


(mil .$) 


1 


448.9 


1,299.7 


1,222.0 


77.7 








2 


837.1 


2,329.3 


2,190.0 


139.3 








3 


23.5 


144.6 


133.6 


11.0 








4 


242.5 


936.8 


865.5 


71.3 








5 


24.1 


228.1 


199.7 


28.3 


21.1 


42.4 


156.4 


6 


40.9 


352.2 


308.5 


43.8 


34.3 


71.5 


239.7 


7 


130.3 


1,214.7 


961.8 


252.8 


115.2 


224.0 


811.8 


8 


95.4 


881.9 


797.7 


84.1 


76.7 


151.0 


522.4 


9 


95.4 


686.4 


621.0 


65.4 


78.9 


173.1 


475.4 


10 


22.6 


199.1 


180.1 


19.0 


15.9 


34.5 


113.5 


11 


2,926.4 


25,061.2 


22,885.0 


2,176.2 








12 


1,517.5 


11,846.5 


10,717.1 


1,129.4 








13 


406.3 


4,079.4 


3,609.7 


469.7 


214.8 


439.4 


1,502.2 


14 


1,845.2 


13,132.8 


11,736.2 


1,396.6 


1,166.5 


2,351.8 


6,332.5 


15 


95.2 


641.7 


510.9 


130.8 


74.7 


141.9 


332.2 


16 


621.8 


3,398.4 


3,100.5 


298.0 


535.1 


1,118.5 


2,363.1 


17 


123.8 


777.3 


700.7 


76.5 


96.7 


200.4 


460.4 


18 


1,477.6 


6,782.0 


6,185.7 


596.3 


1,277.0 


2,324.5 


4,602.9 


19 


176.0 


899.0 


813.6 


85.4 


149.7 


284.0 


594.4 


20 


535.8 


3,074.1 


2,782.0 


292.1 


467.4 


921.4 


2,181 .1 


21 


31.8 


152.4 


138.0 


14.4 


28.3 


55.6 


109.5 


22 


304.4 


1,667.7 


1,516.6 


151.0 


257.3 


513.1 


1,101.0 


23 


130.5 


922.3 


830.0 


92.3 


100.2 


202.6 


552.7 


24 


456.0 


3,862.8 


3,453.9 


408.9 


335.1 


713.1 


2,237.7 


25 


225.8 


1,625.9 


1,461.5 


164.3 


172.6 


358.2 


967.9 


26 


1,069.7 


8,202.3 


7,509.9 


692.4 


631.6 


1,196.1 


4,011.3 


27 


452.4 


4,197.0 


3,715.5 


481.4 


249.6 


507.7 


1,726.1 


28 


217.0 


2,063.1 


1,803.0 


260.1 


121.3 


2,243.3 


798.2 


29 


265.1 


2,420.1 


2,147.8 


272.3 


126.9 


247.4 


752.5 


30 


72.8 


622.4 


557.7 


64.7 


36.3 


73.1 


223.4 


31 


208.3 


2,591.4 


1,969.2 


622.2 


99.3 


202.1 


786.4 


32 


538.9 


3,990.9 


3,500.9 


490.0 


410.1 


815.5 


2,312.5 


33 


34.0 


232.6 


208.2 


24.4 


28.4 


56.8 


152.9 


34 


306.6 


1,474.7 


1,338.0 


136.7 


264.9 


492.4 


994.1 


35 


180.5 


1,409.5 


1,252.4 


157.1 


139.6 


279.2 


866.2 


36 


452.2 


3,366.8 


3,013.3 


353.5 


329.7 


669.2 


1,917.9 


37 


969.1 


9,120.0 


7,798.1 


1,321.9 


752.2 


1,492.3 


5,526.0 


38 


399.0 


3,437.8 


3,016.9 


420.8 


296.6 


611 .0 


1 ,986.3 


39 


81.9 


772.2 


664.9 


107.2 


61.4 


132.1 


453.2 


40 


444.9 


3,468.5 


3,091.5 


377.0 


341.1 


688.2 


2,056.4 



- continued - 
- 13 - 



Industry 
number 



41 
42 
43 
44 
45 
46 
47 
48 
49 
50 



71 

72 
73 
75 
76 
77 
78 
79 
85 
86 

97 
98 

Total 



Table 3. --Employment, Compensation, and Related Measures 

by 85-Industry 1-0 Detail, 1967 

- continued - 



Employ- 
ment 
(000) 



348.4 
488.2 
105.6 
152.0 
197.0 
88.8 
345.1 
217.9 
288.9 
206.3 



51 


215.7 


52 


146.0 


53 


425.7 


54 


177.9 


55 


167.5 


56 


690.0 


57 


439.2 


58 


114.0 


59 


849.0 


60 


828.4 


61 


310.6 


62 


259.1 


63 


152.6 


64 


442.9 


65 


2,566.0 


66 


825.8 


67 


118.9 


68 


540.5 


69 


13,268.0 


70 


2,614.2 



443.3 
1,656.7 
2,385.1 

722.4 

562.7 
5,025.1 

875.7 

327.1 

-5.0 

2,527.0 

6,554.8 
8,139.1 



75,331.2 



All employees 



Compen- 
sation 
(mil.$) 



2,969 
3,635 
1,004 
1,276 
1,701 
779 
3,273.4 
1,878.8 
2,530.6 
1,623.5 

1,951.8 
1,138.8 
3,483.7 
1,351.7 
1,182.6 



6,186 
3,131 

883 
8,463 
8,489 



2,469.2 

1,953.2 

1,411.8 

2,711.4 

20,961.0 

6,820.3 

1,060.2 

4,900.4 

70,286.1 

19,379.3 

1,715.2 
6,926,9 

16,098.3 
3,804.4 
3,053.4 

23,292.6 

5,779.1 

2,048.8 

57.0 

4,701.0 

35,148.3 
46,835.5 



Wages and 
salaries 
(mil.$) 



471,915.0 



2,610.1 
3,250.8 

882.1 
1,106.3 
1,487.2 

697.6 
2,954.6 
1,686.4 
2,247.3 
1,479.2 

1,763.4 
1,013.0 
3,108.9 
1,195.1 
1,051.9 
5,538.0 
2,801.4 
774.5 
7,149.2 
7,545.8 

2,198.5 

1,765.2 

1,251.8 

2,462.7 

18,837.4 

5,652.7 

971.3 

4,264.2 

64,955.0 

17,132.7 

1,571.2 
6,442.8 

14,939,7 
3,539.8 
2 ,335 . 3 

21,659.0 
5,352.8 

1,849.8 

57.0 

4,640.0 

33,226.2 
42,033.6 



Supple- 
ments 
(mil.$) 



359.5 
384.3 
122.0 
170.1 
214.1 
82.1 
318.8 
192.4 
283.3 
144.3 



188 
125 
374 
156 
130 
648.8 
329.6 
109.4 
,314.7 
944.1 

270.7 
188.0 
160.0 



Production workers* 



Number 
(000) 



248, 

2,123. 

1,167, 

88. 

636. 
5,331. 
2,246. 



427,490.2 



1 



144.0 

484.1 

158,6 

264.6 

218.1 

1,633.5 

426.3 

199.0 

.0 

61.0 



1,922.1 
4,801.9 



44,424.8 



280.7 
373.7 

72.1 
104.0 
135.2 

54.9 
256.1 
141.0 
196.6 
169.9 

119.7 
100.6 
276.7 
135.2 
123.1 
411.7 
293.4 
83.7 
615.4 
489.3 

249.0 

175.8 

90.1 

350.9 



Hours 
(mil.) 



14,405.3 



576,5 
764.1 
147.1 
203.2 
269.7 
113.7 
558.0 
296.4 
410.4 
348.5 

237.2 
203.1 
555.3 
262.1 
242.3 
812.0 
576.2 
163.4 
1,238.9 
1,047.6 

493.7 
349.4 
180.8 
673.5 



Wages 
(mil.$) 



28,750.5 



1,878.1 

2,153.9 

540.2 

662,3 

912.6 

379.0 

1,984.5 

950.5 

1,353.7 

1,100.1 



1 



757.0 

603.5 

662.3 

788.1 

641.9 

2,566.6 

1,448.9 

499.2 

4,662.5 

3,792.9 



1,588.7 
978.2 
590.8 

1,586.5 



84,302.0 



*Production workers are defined only for manufacturing and mining industries 
Source: U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Economic Analysis 

- 14 - 



In the case of redefinitions into or within manufacturing and mining, estimates of the 
associated production workers were assumed to be in the same proportion as the receiving 
industry's proportions of production workers to total employees; hours and wages per 
production worker were assumed to be equal to the hours and wages per production worker 
in the receiving industry. FAC workers were assumed to have been classified as nonpro- 
duction workers in the Census and therefore no production workers were redefined to 
construction. 

Detailed reconciliation of NIPA and I-Q data on employment and employee compensation 

A reconciliation of 1-0 with NIPA estimates of employment and compensation at the major 
industry division level is provided in table 2. The NIPA data on employment and compen- 
sation are published annually at the 2-digit SIC level. To provide the users of the 1-0 
tables a bridge between the published NIPA series and the 1-0 estimates, a detailed 
reconciliation of the estimates is provided in Appendix Tables 3 and 4. These tables 
reconcile the NIPA data at the 2-digit level of detail with the 1-0 estimates at the 
85-industry level of detail, showing the statistical and classification differences, 
as well as the effect of redefinitions among the 1-0 industries. The effects of specific 
redefinitions among industries at the 367-industry 1-0 level are given in Appendix Table 
7. These tables should be helpful to analysts who use the current information in the 
NIPA accounts for developing employment and related data consistent with updated BEA 1-0 
tables or their own versions of revised 1-0 tables. 

EVALUATION OF THE INDUSTRY ESTIMATES 

The evaluation of the estimates of employment and compensation in the 1-0 industrial 
detail is as follows: 

Agriculture 

In this highly seasonal industry, an employment or hours worked measure for total labor 
(hired and non-hired) would be more useful analytically than the employment estimate 
which includes only hired workers. In fact, the 1-0 industry detail of employment in 
agriculture was derived from the Department of Agriculture's detailed estimates of hours 
of hired labor. (See Appendix Table 6.) The large seasonal variations in number of 
migratory workers and other fluctuations in agricultural labor make it difficult to apply 
a concept of employees by type of agricultural production. The analyst may wish to 
estimate non-hired employment and hours as well. 

Mining 

The detailed industry estimates of employment and payroll in mining are based directly 
on the data in the 1967 Census of Mineral industries, scaled upward to reflect the 
difference between NIPA and Census totals for all mining and manufacturing. The esti- 
mates for compensation were made by using the NIPA ratio of supplements to payrolls for 
mining. Thus, the mining estimates, prior to adjustments for FAC, have a solid statistical 
base. However, the estimates for FAC redefined out of the Census industry probably 
contain a fair margin of error. For all the 1-0 mining industries, FAC accounted for 
about 12 percent of the employment. About 80 percent of the FAC employment in mining 
came from oil and gas well drilling performed by integrated producers. Except for oil 
and gas well drilling, the industrial detail for mining, statistical adjustments, and 
classification changes are based firmly on Census information which is consistent with 
the production data for the mining industries. 

- 15 - 



Construction 

The analysis of the construction industry for the 1-0 table was done in terms of 49 
types of new and maintenance construction. This detail is aggregated to seven types 
of construction in the 367-industry table and two types in the 85-industry table. The 
initial disaggregation of NIPA figures for compensation in contract construction in- 
volved some solid source data and informed judgment. The redefinitions of FAC amount 
to about one-fourth of the compensation estimate for total construction. The other 
redefinitions are relatively minor. The use of constant payroll per employee ratios 
to estimate employment by construction type for contract construction and to estimate 
employment corresponding to FAC redefinitions, obviously introduces some weaknesses in 
the most detailed estimates. However, the problem washes out to some extent in the 
aggregation to five new construction types and two maintenance and repair types. 

Manufacturing 

The comparison of NIPA and Census data on employment in manufacturing as a whole shows 
close agreement. The Census detail was used in the 1-0 study and required no further 
breakdown, except for CAO's. For the latter, only approximate data existed for the 
allocation to the more detailed industries. The redefinitions, including those for MSO's 
and FAC, are relatively small and do not significantly affect the individual estimates 
of employment and compensation. 

However, it should be mentioned that some ambiguity exists in the Census 1 definition of 
production workers. The Census questionnaire does not make it sufficiently clear 
whether FAC workers are included. Some may have been incorrectly reported as production 
workers. After discussion with Census personnel, it was decided that most were correctly 
included in nonproduction workers. Thus, redefinitions of FAC out of manufacturing 
did not remove any production workers. There is probably some error due to this 
assumption. 

Transportation 

NIPA data are consistent with the definitions used in the 1-0 study. There are no NIPA - 
1-0 adjustments and the classification differences within the industry are minor, The 
redefinitions for FAC and manufacturing activities in the industry are derived indirectly 
from information published by agencies which regulate transportation. The FAC estimates 
are judged to be of rather poor quality. Other redefinitions are small and have little 
impact on the estimates. 

Communications and utilities 

The information needed to modify the NIPA detail and redefine FAC was available from data 
published by the agencies which regulate these industries. The estimates are considered 
to be good for all the component industries except water and sanitary services, for which 
the FAC estimates are weak. 

Trade 

No additional industry detail had to be estimated for trade. However, classification 
changes and redefinitions into and out of trade affect about 12 percent of employment in 
trade. The redefinition of employment in MSO's and the other specific redefinitions into 
and out of trade account for the major part of the differences. The MSO employment and 
payrolls are published by the Census and should be good. The redefinitions of services 
in trade and trade activities in services are considered poor. 

- 16 - 



Finance, insurance , and real estate 

The NIPA and 1-0 industry detail are the same and consistent with the 1-0 definition of 
output for these industries. While the redefinition of employment for FAC amounts to 
about six percent of the total, it is mainly related to the real estate component, for 
which FAC is especially important. The FAC redefinitions in real estate are considered 
of poor quality. 

Services 

The NIPA estimates for employment and compensation largely matched those required for 
the individual 1-0 industry estimates. The FAC estimates were derived indirectly and 
are considered to be of poor quality, but they are very small for individual industries 
and in total. Other redefinitions in and out of services are largely the counterpart 
of those in trade, as discussed above. 

Employee compensation compared with value added 

The estimates of employee compensation presented in this report were compared to value 
added at the 3G7- and 484-industry levels. Most of the ratios of employee compensation 
to value added for the 367-order industries, shown in Appendix Table 5, appear to be 
reasonable. 

However, in some cases--mainly in manufacturing—the ratios are unreasonably high and 
for five of the manufacturing industries at the 367-industry level (I-O's 13.04, 17.05, 
56.02, 57.02, and 61.01) employee compensation exceeds value added. At the 484-industry 
level, where the ratio exceeded 0.9 (41 cases, excluding government enterprises) or was 
less than 0.1 (eight cases), the compensation estimates were reviewed to verify that the 
methodology used to make the 1-0 estimates did not distort the Census data upon which 
they were based. The industries where high ratios appear usually constitute a relatively 
small portion of the 85-order industry in which they are included and hence have little 
effect on the ratios at this level of detail. The low ratios occur in agriculture and 
real estate. 

The high ratios apparently stem from the lack of adequate data used to estimate value 
added and intermediate inputs for mining and manufacturing industries. To an important 
extent, value added for an industry was derived residual ly, as gross output less the sun. 
of intermediate inputs. Value added guides, based on NIPA data, existed only at the 
85-industry level. Therefore, errors in the estimation of intermediate inputs affect 
the value added total. This difficulty manifests itself glaringly in a few cases, for 
which the census of Manufactures, 1967 payroll total, even without adjustment for CAO's, 
exceeds the 1-0 value added. 

However, the detailed compensation and employment estimates in Appendix Table 5 are con- 
sistent with total output as defined in the 1967 1-0 tables, using published data from 
the economic censuses and other Federal sources. Therefore, these estimates are considered 
useful with the 1-0 output data. 10/ 



10. The industry output data for the revised 1-0 study for 1967 at the 85-industry 
level are available in BEA Staff Paper No. 29. The revised 367- and 484-industry tables 
are available only on computer tape. However, the 367-industry table from the original 
1967 study has been published and the output totals differ very little from those in 
the revised table. The only industry which shows a substantial change is computing and 
related machines, for which output and final demand were reduced by $515 million and 
value added by $200 million. Hence, the published 367-industry table can be considered 
consistent with industry employment and compensation estimates produced in this report. 

- 17 - 



Appendix Table 1 
Industry Classification of the 1967 Input-Output Tables 



The titles in bold face represent the groupings of industries 
used for the summary version of the 1967 tables and 
were also used in the 1958 and 1963 input-output 
tables prepared by the Bureau of Economic Analysis. 



Industry number and title 



Related Census- 

SIC codes (1967 

edition) 



AGRICULTURE, FORESTRY, AND FISHERIES 

1 Livestock and livestock products 

1. 01 Dairy farm products 

1. 02 Poultry and eggs_ _ . 

1. 03 Meat animals and miscellaneous 

livestock products. 

2 Other agricultural products 

2. 01 Cotton _ 

2. 02 Food feed grains and grass seeds 

2. 03 Tobacco 

2. 04 Fruits and tree nuts 

2. 05 Vegetables, sugar, and miscellaneous 

crops. 
2. 06 Oil bearing crops 

2. 07 Forest, greenhouse, and nursery 

products. 

3 Forestry and fishery products 

3. 00 Forestry and fishery products 



4 Agricultural, forestry, and fishery 
services 

4. 00 Agricultural, forestry, and fishery 

services. 



5 Iron and ferroalloy ores mining 

Iron and ferroalloy ores< mining 

6 Nonferrous metal ores mining 
Copper ore fnining 

Nonferrous metal ores mining, ex- 
cept copper. 

7 Coal mining 
Coal mining 

8 Crude petroleum and natural gas 

Crude petroleum and natural gas — 

9 Stone and'clay mining and quarrying 

Stone and clay mining and 
quarrying. 



10 Chemicals and fertilizer mineral mining 

10. 00 Chemical and fertilizer mineral 

mining. 



MINING 


5. 


00 


6. 
6. 


01 
02 


7. 


00 


8. 


00 


9. 


00 



0132, pt. 014. 
0133,0134, pt. 

014. 
0135, 0136, 0139, 

pt. 014, 0193, 

pt. 0729. 

0112, pt. 014. 

0113, pt. 0119, 
pt. 014. 

pt. 0114, pt. 014. 

0122, pt. 014. 

0123, pt. 0119, 
pt. 014. 

pt. 0113, pt. 

0119, pt. 014. 
0192, pt. 014. 



074, 081, 082, 084, 
086,091. 



071,0723, 073, 
pt. 0729, 085, 
098. 



CONSTRUCTION 

11 New construction 



11. 01 

11. 02 

11. 03 

11. 04 
11.05 



New construction, residential build- 
ings (nonfarm). 



New construction, nonresidential 

buildings. 
New construction, public utilities. 



New construction, highways. 
New construction, all other. 



1011, 106. 



102. 

103, 104, 105, 
108, 109. 



11, 12. 
1311, 1321. 



141, 142, 144, 145, 
148, 149. 



147. 



12 Maintenance and repair construction 

12. 01 Maintenance and repair construc- 

tion, residential buildings (non- 
farm) . 



pt. 15, pt. 16, 
pt. 17, pt. 
6561. 

pt. 15, pt. 17. 

pt. 15, pt. 16, 

pt. 17. 
pt. 16, pt. 17. 
pt. 15, pt. 16, pt. 

17, pt. 138. 

pt. 15, pt. 17. 



Industry number and title 



Related Census- 

SIC codes (1967 

edition) 



12. 02 Maintenance and repair construc- 

tion, all other. 

MANUFACTURING 

13 Ordnance and accessories 

Complete guided missiles 

Ammunition, except for small arms, 
n.e.c. 

Tanks and tank components 

Sighting and fire control equipment. 

Small arms 

Small arms ammunition 

Other ordnance and accessories 



13. 01 
13. 02 

13.03 
13.04 
13. 05 
13.06 

13. 07 

14. 01 
14. 02 
14.03 
14.04 
14. 05 
14. 06 
14.07 
14.08 
14.09 
14. 10 
14. 11 
14. 12 
14. 13 
14. 14 
14. 15 
14. 16 
14. 17 
14. 18 
14. 19 
14. 20 
14. 21 
14. 22 
14. 23 
14. 24 
14. 25 
14. 26 
14. 27 
14.28 
14. 29 

14. 30 
14.31 
14.32 

15. 01 
15.02 



16. 01 

16. 02 
16.03 

16. 04 



17. 01 
17. 02 
17. 03 
17.04 
17. 05 
17. 06 
17. 07 
17. 08 
17. 09 

17. 10 

18.01 

18. 02 
18. 03 
18. 04 



19.01 



14 Food and kindred products 

Meat products 

Creamery butter 

Cheese, natural and processed 

Condensed and evaporated milk 

Ice cream and frozen desserts 

Fluid milk 

Canned and cured sea foods 

Canned specialties 

Canned fruits and vegetables 

Dehydrated food products 

Pickles, sauces, and salad dressings. 

Fresh or frozen packaged fish 

Frozen fruits and vegetables 

Flour and cereal preparations 

Prepared feeds for animals and fowls 

Rice milling 

Wet corn milling 

Bakery products 

Sugar 

Confectionery and related products. 

Alcoholic beverages 

Bottled and canned soft drinks 

Flavoring extracts and sirups, n.e.c. 

Cottonseed oil mills 

Soybean oil mills 

Vegetable oil mills, n.e.c 

Animal and marine fats and oils.. 

Roasted coffee 

Shortening and cooking oils 

Manufactured ice 

Macaroni and spaghetti 

Food preparations, n.e.c 



16 



15 Tobacco manufactures 

Cigarettes, cigars, etc 

Tobacco stemming and redrying.. 

Broad and narrow fabrics, yarn and 
thread mills 

Broadwoven fabric mills and fabric 
finishing plants. 

Narrow fabric mills 

Yarn mills and finishing of textiles, 

n.e.c. 
Thread mills 



17 Miscellaneous textile goods and floor 
coverings 

Floor coverings 

Felt goods, n.e.c 

Lace goods 

Paddings and upholstery fillings 

Processed textile waste 

Coated fabrics, not rubberized 

Tire cord and fabric 

Scouring and combing plants 

Cordage and twine 

Textile goods, n.e.c 



18 Apparel 

Hosiery 

Knit apparel mills. . . 

Knit fabric mills 

Apparel made from 
materials. 



purchased 



19 



Miscellaneous 
products. 

Curtains and draperies 



fabricated textile 



pt. 15, pt. 16, 
pt. 17, pt. 138. 



1925. 
1929. 

1931. 
1941. 
1951. 
1961. 
1911, 1999. 

201. 

2021. 

2022. 

2023. 

2024. 

2026. 

2031. 

2032. 

2033. 

2034. 

2035. 

2036. 

2037. 

2041, 2043, 2045. 

2042. 

2044. 

2046. 

205. 

206. 

207. 

2082-5. 

2086. 

2087. 

2091. 

2092. 

2093. 

2094. 

2095. 

2096. 

2097. 

2098. 

2099. 

2111,2121,2131. 
2141. 



2211,2221,2231, 

2261, 2262. 
2241. 
2269, 2281-3. 

2284. 



227. 

2291. 

2292. 

2293. 

2294. 

2295. 

2296. 

2297. 

2298. 

2299. 

2251,2252. 
2253, 2254, 2259. 
2256. 
23 (excl. 
239), 39996. 



2391. 



18 - 



Appendix Table 1 
Industry Classification of the 1967 Input-Output Tables — Continued 



19.02 
19. 03 



20.01 

20. 02 
20. 03 
20.04 
20. 0.5 
20. 06 
20. 07 
20. 08 
20. 09 



21. 00 



22. 


01 


22. 


02 


22. 


03 


22. 


04 


23. 


01 


23. 


02 


23. 


08 


23. 


04 


23. 


05 


23. 


06 



23. 07 



24. 01 
24. 02 
24. 03 
24. 04 
24. 05 
24.06 

24.07 



25. 00 



26. 


01 


26. 


02 


26. 


03 


26. 


04 


26. 


05 


26. 


06 


26. 


07 


26. 


08 



27. 01 



27. 


02 


27. 


03 


27. 


04 


28. 


01 


28. 


02 


28. 


03 


28. 


04 



Industry number and title 



20 



23 



Housefurnishings, n.e.c 2392. 

Fabricated textile products, n.e.c. 2393-9. 



Related Census- 
Si C codes (1967 
edition) 



Lumber and wood products, except 

containers 

Logging camps and logging contrac- 
tors. 
Sawmills and planing mills, general. 
Hardwood dimensions and flooring. 

Special product sawmills, n.e.c 

Mill work 

Veneer and plywood 

Prefabricated wood structures 

Wood preserving 

Wood products, n.e.c 



21 Wooden containers 

Wooden containers. 



22 Household furniture 

Wood household furniture 

Upholstered household furniture.. 

Metal household furniture 

Mattresses and bedsprings 



Other furniture and fixtures 

Wood office furniture 

Metal office furniture 

Public building furniture 

Wood partitions and fixtures 

Metal partitions and fixtures 

Venetian blinds and shades 

Furniture and fixtures, n.e.c 



24 Paper and allied products except con- 

tainers and boxes 

Pulp mills 

Paper mills, except building paper. 

Paperboard mills 

Envelopes 

Sanitary paper products 

Wallpaper and building paper and 

board mills. 
Converted paper, products, n.e.c, 

except containers and boxes. 

25 Paperboard containers and boxes 

Paperboard containers and boxes.. 

26 Printing and publishing 

Newspapers 

Periodicals 

Book printing and publishing 

Miscellaneous publishing 

Commercial printing 

Manifold business forms, blank- 
books, and binders. 

Greeting card publishing 

Miscellaneous printing services 

27 Chemicals and selected chemical prod- 
ucts 

Industrial inorganic and organic 

chemicals. 
Fertilizers 

Agricultural chemicals, n.e.c 

Miscellaneous chemical products 

28 Plastics and synthetic materials 

Plastics materials and resins 

Synthetic rubber 

Cellulosic man-made fibers 

Organic fibers, noncellulosic 



29 Drugs, cleaning and toilet preparations 
29. 01 Drugs 

29. 02 Cleaning preparations 

29. 03 Toilet preparations 



30. 00 



30 Paints and allied products 

Paints and allied products. 



2411. 

2421. 
2426. 
2429. 
2431. 
2432. 
2433. 
2491. 
2499. 



244. 



2511,2519. 
2512. 
2514. 
2515. 



2521. 
2522. 
2531. 
2541. 
2542. 
2591. 
2599. 



2611. 
2621. 
2631. 
2642. 
2647. 
2644, 2661. 

2641, 2643, 2645, 
2646, 2649. 



265. 



2711. 
2721. 
273. 
2741. 

2751, 2752. 
2761, 2782. 

2771. 

2753, 2789, 279. 



281 (excl. 28195.) 

2871, 2872. 

2879. 

2861,289. 



2821. 
2822. 
2823. 
2824. 



283 

284(excl. 2844.) 

2S44. 



2851. 



31. 01 

31.02 
31. 03 



32.01 
32. 02 
32. 03 

32. 04 



33. 00 



34. 01 
34. 02 
34. 03 



35. 01 

35. 02 

36. 01 
36. 02 
36. 03 
36. 04 
36. 05 
36. 06 
36. 07 
36. 08 
36. 09 
36. 10 
36. 11 
36. 12 
36. 13 
36. 14 
36. 15 
36. 16 
36. 17 
36. 18 
36. 19 
36. 20 
36. 21 

36. 22 

37. 01 



37. 


02 


37. 


03 


37. 


04 


38. 


01 


38. 


02 


38. 


03 


38. 


04 


38. 


05 


38. 


06 


38. 


07 


38. 


08 


38. 


09 


38. 


10 


38. 


11 


38. 


12 


38. 


13 


38. 


14 


39. 


01 


39. 


02 


40. 


01 


40. 


02 



Industry number and title 



Related Census- 

SIC codes (1967 

edition) 



31 Petroleum refining and related indus- 
tries 

Petroleum refining and related 
products. 

Paving mixtures and blocks 

Asphalt felts and coatings 

32 Rubber and miscellaneous plastics 
products 

Tires and inner tubes 

Rubber footwear 

Reclaimed rubber and miscellaneous 

rubber products, n.e.c. 
Miscellaneous plastics products 

33 Leather tanning and industrial leather 
products 

Leather tanning and industrial 
leather products. 

34 Footwear and other leather products 

Footwear cut stock 

Footwear except rubber 

Other leather products 



35 Glass and glass products 

Glass and glass products except con- 
tainers. 
Glass containers 

36 Stone and clay products 

Cement, hydraulic 

Brick and structural clay tile 

Ceramic wall and floor tile 

Clay refractories 

Structural clay products, n.e.c 

Vitreous plumbing fixtures 

Food utensils, pottery 

Porcelain electrical supplies 

Pottery products, n.e.c 

Concrete block and brick 

Concrete products, n.e.c 

Ready-mixed concrete 

Lime 

Gypsum products 

Cut stone and stone products 

Abrasive products 

Asbestos products 

Gaskets and insulations 

Minerals, ground or treated 

Mineral wool 

Nonclay refractories. . 

Nonmetallic mineral products, n.e.c. 

37 Primary iron and steel manufacturing 

Blast furnaces and basic steel prod- 
ucts. 

Iron and steel foundries 

Iron and steel forgings 

Primary metal products, n.e.c 

38 Primary nonferrous metals manufac- 
turing 

Primary copper 

Primary lead 

Primary zinc 

Primary aluminum 

Primary nonferrous metals, n.e.c 

Secondary nonferrous metals 

Copper rolling and drawing 

Aluminum rolling and drawing 

Nonferrous rolling and drawing, 

n.e.c. 
Nonferrous wire drawing and insu- 
lating. 

Aluminum castings 

Brass, bronze, and copper castings.. 

Nonferrous castings, n.e.c 

Nonferrous forgings 

39 Metal containers 

Metal cans 

Metal barrels, drums, and pails 

40 Heating, plumbing, and fabricated 
structural metal products 

Metal sanitary ware 

Plumbing fittings and brass goods. .. 



2911, 299. 

2951. 
2952. 



3011. 
3021. 
3031, 3069. 

3079. 



3111, 3121. 



3131. 
314. 

3151, 3161. 317, 
3199. 

3211, 3229, 3231. 

3221. 

3241. 

3251. 

3253. 

3255. 

3259. 

3261. 

3262, 3263. 

3264. 

3269. 

3271. 

3272. 

3273. 

3274. 

3275. 

32S1. 

3291. 

3292. 

3293. 

3295. 

3296. 

3297. 

3299. 

331. 

332. 

3391. 

3399. 



3331. 

3332. 

3333. 

3334. 28195. 

3339. 

3341. 

3351. 

3352. 

3356. 

3357. 

3361. 
1362 

3369. 
3392. 

3411. 

3491. 



3431. 
3432. 



19 



Appendix Table 1 
Industry Classification of the 1967 Input-Output Tables — Continued 



Industry number and title 



Related Census- 

SIC codes (1967 

edition) 



40 


03 


40. 


04 


40. 


05 


40. 


06 


40. 


07 


40. 


08 


40. 


09 


41. 


01 


41. 


02 


42. 


01 


42. 


02 


42. 


03 


42. 


04 


42. 


05 


42. 


06 


42. 


07 


42. 


08 


42. 


09 


42. 


10 


42. 


11 


43. 


01 


43. 


02 



44. 00 



45.01 
45. 02 
45. 03 



46. 01 
46.02 

46. 03 
46. 04 



47. 01 
47. 02 
47.03 

47. 04 



48.01 
48. 02 
48. 03 
48. 04 
48. 05 
48. 06 



49. 01 
49. 02 
49. C3 
49. 04 
49. 05 
49. 06 
49. 07 



50.00 



51.01 



Heating equipment, except electric- 
Fabricated structural steel 

Metal doorsj sash,and trim 

Fabricated plate work (boiler shops) 

Sheet metal work 

Architectural metal work 

Miscellaneous metal work 

41 Screw machine products, bolts, nuts, 
etc. and metal stampings 

Screw machine products and bolts, 

nuts, rivets, and washers. 
Metal stampings 

42 Other fabricated metal products 

Cutlery 

Hand and edge tools including saws' 

Hardware, n.e.c 

Coating, engraving, and allied serv- 
ices. 
Miscellaneous fabricated wire prod- 
ucts. 

Safes and vaults.. 

Steel springs 

Pipe, valves, and pipe fittings 

Collapsible tubes 

Metal foil and leaf 

Fabricated metal products, n.e.c 

43 Engines and turbines 

Steam engines and turbines 

Internal combustion engines, n.e.c. 

44 Farm machiney 

Farm machinery 

45 Construction, mining, oil field ma- 
chinery equipment 

Construction machinery 

Mining machinery 

Oil field machinery 

46 Materials handling machinery and 
equipment 

Elevators and moving stairways 

Conveyors and conveying equip- 
ment. 

Hoists, cranes, and monorails 

Industrial trucks and tractors 

47 Metalworking machinery and equip- 
ment 

Machine tools, metal cutting types. 
Machine tools, metal forming types. 
Special dies and tools and machine 

tool accessories. 
Metalworking machinery, n.e.c 

48 Special industry machinery and equip- 
ment 

Food products machinery 

Textile machinery 

Woodworking machinery 

Paper industries machinery 

Printing trades machinery 

Special industry machinery, n.e.c 

49 General industrial machinery and 
equipment 

Pumps and compressors 

Ball and roller bearings 

Blowers and fans 

Industrial patterns 

Power transmission eauipment 

Industrial furnaces and ovens 

General industrial machinery, n.e.c. 

50 Machine shop products 

Machine shop products 

51 Office, computing, and accounting ma- 
chines 

Computing and related machines.. 



3433. 
3441. 
3442. 
3443. 
3444. 
3446. 
3449. 



345. 
3461. 



3421. 

3423, 3425. 
3429. 
3471, 3479. 

3481. 

3492. 

3493. 

3494, 3498. 

3496. 

3497. 

3499. 



3511. 
3519. 



3522. 



3531. 
3532. 
3533. 



3534. 
3535. 

3536. 
3537. 



3541. 
3542. 
3544, 3545. 

3548. 



3551. 
3552. 
3553. 
3554. 
3555. 
3559. 



3561. 
3562. 
3564. 
3565. 
3566. 
3567. 
3569. 



359. 



3573, 3574. 



Industry number and title 



51. 02 Typewriters 

51. 03 Scales and balances 

51. 04 Office machines, n.e.c 

52 Service industry machines 

52. 01 Automatic merchandising machines. 

52. 02 Commercial laundry equipment 

52. 03 Refrigeration machinery 

52. 04 Measuring and dispensing pumps 

52. 05 Service industry machines, n.e.c 

53 Electric transmission and distribution 
equipment and electrical industrial 
apparatus 

53. 01 Electric measuring instruments 

53. 02 Transformers 

53. 03 Switchgear and switchboard appa- 

ratus. 

53. 04 Motors and generators 

53. 05 Industrial controls 

53. 06 Welding apparatus 

53. 07 Carbon and graphite products 

53. 08 Electrical industrial apparatus, n.e.c. 

54 Household appliances 

54. 01 Household cooking equipment 

54. 02 Household refrigerators and freezers. 

54. 03 Household laundry equipment 

54. 04 Electric housewares and fans 

54. 05 Household vacuum cleaners 

54. 06 Sewing machines 

54. 07 Household appliances, n.e.c 

55 Electric lighting and wiring equipment 

55. 01 Electric lamps 

55. 02 Lighting fixtures 

55. 03 Wiring devices 

56 Radio, television and communication 
equipment 

56. 01 Radio and television receiving sets__ 
56. 02 Phonograph records 

56. 03 Telephone and telegraph apparatus. 

56. 04 Radio and television communication 

equipment. 

57 Electronic components and accessories 

57. 01 Electron tubes 

57. 02 Semiconductors 

57. 03 Electronic components, n.e.c 

58 Miscellaneous electrical machinery, 
equipment and supplies 

58. 01 Storage batteries 

58. 02 Primary batteries, wet and dry 

58. 03 X-ray apparatus and tubes 

58. 04 Engine electrical equipment 

58. 05 Electrical equipment, n.e.c 

59 Motor vehicles and equipment 

59. 01 Truck and bus bodies 

59. 02 Truck trailers 

59. 03 Motor vehicles and parts 

60 Aircraft and parts 

60. 01 Aircraft 

60. 02 Aircraft engines and parts 

60. 03 Aircraft propellers and parts 

60. 04 Aircraft equipment, n.e.c 

61 Other transportation equipment 

61. 01 Shipbuilding and repairing 

61. 02 Boatbuilding and repairing 

61. 03 Locomotives and parts 

6 1 . 04 Railroad and street cars 

61. 05 Motorcycles, bicycles and parts 

61. 06 Trailer coaches 

61. 07 Transportation equipment, n.e.c 

62 Professional, scientific and controlling 
instruments, and supplies 

62. 01 Engineering and scientific instru- 

ments. 

20 - 



Related Census- 

SIC codes (1967 

edition) 



3572. 
3576. 
3579. 



3581. 
3582. 
3585. 
3586. 
3589. 



3611. 
3612. 
3613. 

3621. 
3622. 
3623. 
3624. 
3629. 



3631. 
3632. 
3633. 
3634. 
3635. 
3636. 
3639. 



3641. 
3642. 
3643, 3644. 



3651. 
3652. 
3661. 
3662. 



3671, 3672, 3673. 

3674. 

3679. 



3691. 
3692. 
3693. 
3694. 
3699. 



3713. 
3715. 
3711, 3714. 



3721. 

3722. 

37295. 

3729 (excl. 37295). 



3731. 
3732. 
3741. 
3742. 
3751. 
3791. 
3799. 



3811. 



Appendix Table 1 
Industry Classification of the 1967 Input-Output Tables — Continued 



Industry number and title 



Related Census- 

SIC codes (1967 

edition) 



62. 02 
62.03 
62. 04 
62.05 
62. 06 
62.07 



63. 01 
63.02 
63.03 



64.01 

64. 02 
64. 03 
64. 04 
64. 05 
64. 06 
64.07 
64.08 
64. 09 
64. 10 
64. 11 
64. 12 



Mechanical measuring devices 

Automatic temperature controls 

Surgical and medical instruments 

Surgical appliances and supplies 

Dental equipment and supplies 

Watches, clocks and parts 

63 Optical, ophthalmic and photographic 
equipment and supplies 

Optical instruments and lenses 

Opththalmic goods 

Photographic equipment and sup- 
plies. 

64 Miscellaneous manufacturing 

Jewelry, including costume, and 
silverware. 

Musical instruments and parts 

Games, toys, etc 

Sporting and athletic goods, n.e.c. 

Pens, pencils, etc 

Artificial flowers 

Buttons, needles, pins and fasteners 

Brooms and brushes 

Hard surface floor covering 

Morticians goods 

Signs and advertising displays 

Miscellaneous manufactures, n.e.c. 



TRANSPORTATION, COMMUNICATION, 

ELECTRIC, GAS, AND SANITARY SERVICES 



65.01 
65.02 



65.03 

65.04 
65. 05 
65. 06 
65.07 



66.00 



67.00 



68.01 
68. 02 
68. 03 



65 Transportation and warehousing 

Railroads and related services 

Local, suburban and interurban 
highway passenger transporta- 
tion. 
Motor freight transportation and 
warehousing. 

Water transportation 

Air transportation 

Pipe line transportation 

Transportation services 



66 Communications, except radio and 
television broadcasting 

Communications, except radio and 
television. 

67 Radio and television broadcasting 

Radio and television broadcasting... 

68 Electric, gas, water and sanitary 
services 

Electric utilities 

Gas utilities 

Water and sanitary services 



WHOLESALE AND RETAIL TRADE 



69. 01 



69.02 



69 Wholesale and retail trade 
Wholesale trade 



Retail trade. 



3821. 
3822. 
3841. 
3842. 
3843. 
387. 



3831. 
3851. 
3861. 



391, 3961. 

3931. 

3941, 3942, 3943. 

3949. 

395. 

3962. 

3963, 3964. 

3991. 

3996. 

3994. 

3993. 

3999 (excl. 39996). 



40, 474. 
41. 



42, 473. 

44. 
45. 
46. 

47, (excl. 473, 
474.). 



48, (excl. 483). 



483. 



491, pt. 493. 

492, pt. 493. 
494, 495, 496, 

497, pt. 493. 



50 (excl. manu- 
facturers' sales 
offices). 

52, 53, 54, 55, 56, 
57, 58, 59, 
7396, pt. 8099. 



FINANCE, INSURANCE AND REAL ESTATE 

70 Finance and insurance 

70. 01 Banking 

70. 02 Credit agencies 

70. 03 Security and commodity brokers 

70. 04 Insurance carriers 

70. 05 Insurance agents and brokers 

71 Real estate and rental 

71. 01 Owner-occupied dwellings 

71. 02 Real estate 



60. 

61, 67. 
62. 
63. 
64. 



65 (excl. pt. 
6561), 66. 




Related Census- 

SIC codes H967 

edition) 



SERVICES 



72. 01 
72. 02 



72.03 



73.01 



73. 02 
73.03 



72 Hotels and lodging places, personal 
and repair services, except automobile 
repair 

Hotels and lodging places 

Personal and repair services except 
auto repair and barber and beauty 
shops. 



Barber and beauty shops. 
73 Business services 



Miscellaneous business services. 



75. 00 

76. 01 
76. 02 



77. 01 

77.02 
77.03 

77.04 

77. 05 



Advertising 

Miscellaneous professional services. . 

74 Research and development 

Eliminated as a separate industry in 
the 1963 study. Research and devel- 
opment performed for sale is dis- 
tributed to the purchaser by each 
of the industries performing the 
research and development. 

75 Automobile repair and services 

Automobile repair and services 

76 Amusements 

Motion pictures 

Amusement and services 

77 Medical, educational services, 
nonprofit organizations 



and 



Doctors and dentists . 



Hospitals 

Other medical and health services. 

Educational services 

Nonprofit organizations 



GOVERNMENT ENTERPRISES 

78 Federal Government enterprises 

78. 01 Post Office 

78.02 Federal electric utilities 

78. 03 Commodity Credit Corporation 

78. 04 Other Federal Government en- 

terprises. 

79 State and local government enterprises 

79. 01 Local government passenger transit. 
79. 02 State and local electric utilities 

79. 03 Other state and local government 

enterprises. 
IMPORTS 

80 Gross imports of goods and services 
80.01 Directly allocated imports 

80. 02 Transferred imports 



70. 

72 (excl. 723, 724) 
76 (excl. 7692, 
7694, and 

pt. 7699). 
723, 724. 

73 (excl. 731, 

7396), 7692, 
7694, pt. 7699. 

731. 

81, 89 (excl. 
8921). 



75. 

78. 
79. 



801, 802, 803, 

804. 
8061. 
0722, 807, 809. 

(excl. pt. 8099) 
82 
84, 86, 8921. 



DUMMY INDUSTRIES 

81 Business travel, entertainment and gifts 

81. 00 Business travel, entertainment and 

gifts. 

82 Office supplies 

82. 00 Office supplies 

83 Scrap, used and secondhand goods 

83. 00 Scrap, used and secondhand goods _ 

SPECIAL INDUSTRIES 

84 Government industry 

84. 00 Government industry 



85. 00 

86. 00 



85 Rest of the world industry- 

Rest of the world industry. 

86 Household industry 

Household industry 



Source: U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Economic Analysis. 



21 



Appendix Table 1 
Industry Classification of the 1967 Input-Output Tables --Continued 



Industry number and title 



Related Census-- 
SIC codes (1967 
edition) 



87 Inventory valuation adjustment 

87.00 Inventory valuation adjustment 

88.00 Total intermediate output 

Personal consumption expenditures 
91.00 Personal consumption expenditures 

Gross private fixed capital formation 
92.00 Gross private fixed capital formation 

Net inventory change 
93.00 Net inventory change 

Net exports 
94.00 Net exports 

Federal Government purchases 
97.10 Federal Government purchases, defense 

Federal Government purchases, other -■ 

State and local government purchases 
98.60 State and local government purchases, 

education 

98.70 State and local government purchases, 

health, welfare and sanitation 

98.80 State and local government purchases, 

safety 

98.90 State and local government purchases, 

other 

99.02 Total final demand 

99.03 Total output 

99.04 Transfers-out 

I Total intermediate inputs 

V.A. Value added 

T Total inputs 

TR Transfers-in --■ 



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1/ Manufacturers' sales offices. 

2/ NIPA combines SIC's 19 + (37-371); all the NIPA - 1-0 adjustments were 
assumed to come out of (37-371). 

Employees Compensation 

(Thousands) (Million $) 

-1,053.0 -9,877.2 Transferred to SIC 37-371 

1,131.0 10,883.2 Census 37-371 

78.0 1,006.0 NIPA - 1-0 adjustment 

3/ Represents sum of the following reclassifications. 

Employees Compensation 

(Thousands) (Million $) 

(A) -13.5 -59.5 Trading stamps from 1-0 73 to 

1-0 69 

(B) -15.8 -85.4 SIC 84 moved to 1-0 77 

(C) -93.6 -752.0 SIC 8921 moved to 1-0 77 

(D) 107.6 712.5 SIC 7692, 7694, 7699 moved from 



1-0 72 to 1-0 73 



Total -15.3 -184.5 



Row B was estimated using the County Business Pattern ratio of SIC 84 to the 
sum of SIC's 84 and 89, multiplied against the NIPA combined total of SIC's 
84 and 89. Rows C and D were estimated similarly. 

4/ From row D of footnote 3. 

5/ Contains the estimates shown in rows B and C of footnote 3, plus the reclassi- 
fication of veterinarians from 1-0 4 to 1-0 77. For veterinarians there were: 
22,700 employees and $90.3 million in employee compensation. 



- 32 



Appendix Table 5 
Employment, Compensation, and Related Measures, by 367-Industry 1-0 Detail, 1967 







All emplc 


yees 




Production workers 


Value 




Indus- 


Employ- 
ment 


Compen- 
sation 


Wages and 
salaries 


Supple- 
ments 


Comp. 


try 


Number 


Hours 


Wages 


to VA 


number 


(000) 


(mil .$) 


{mil .$) 


(mil .$) 


(000) 


(mil.) 


(mil.$) 


added 


ratio 


1.01 


203.7 


626.1 


588.6 


37.4 








2,635.8 


.24 


1.02 


48.1 


107.8 


101.3 


6.4 








423.6 


.25 


1.03 


197.1 


565.9 


532.0 


33.8 








5,093.7 


.11 


2.01 


57,3 


93.2 


87.6 


5.6 








407.5 


.23 


2.02 


196,8 


560.5 


527.0 


33.5 








6,767.8 


.08 


2.03 


76,7 


140.6 


132.2 


8.4 








869.5 


.16 


2.04 


214.7 


699.7 


657.9 


41.8 








1,172.3 


.60 


2.05 


247.7 


724.5 


681.2 


43.3 








2,146.6 


.34 


2.06 


29,1 


71.1 


66.9 


4.3 








1,761.4 


.04 


2.07 


14.7 


39.7 


37.3 


2.4 








885.6 


.04 


3.00 


23,5 


144.6 


133.6 


11.0 








819. P 


.18 


a. oo 


242.5 


936.8 


865.5 


71.3 








1,559.2 


.60 


5.00 


24,1 


228.1 


199.7 


28,3 


21.1 


42.4 


156.4 


506.8 


.45 


6.01 


19,5 


183.0 


160.3 


22.7 


15.0 


32.5 


114. 6 


347.0 


.53 


6.02 


21,4 


169.2 


148.2 


21.0 


19.3 


39.0 


125.1 


268.2 


.63 


7.00 


130,3 


1.214.7 


961.8 


252.8 


115.2 


224.0 


81 1.8 


1,856.5 


.65 


8.00 


95,4 


881.9 


797.7 


8 4.1 


76.7 


151.0 


522.1 


8,607.9 


.10 


9.00 


95,4 


686.4 


621.0 


65.4 


78.9 


173.1 


475.4 


1,322.3 


.52 


10.00 


22.6 


199.1 


180.1 


19.0 


15.9 


34.5 


113. 5 


598.9 


.33 


11.01 


935.4 


7,172.5 


6»5ei.7 


590.8 








10,366.7 


.69 


11.02 


952,0 


8,620.4 


7,907.7 


712.7 








10,276.6 


.84 


11.03 


383,4 


3,555.7 


3,184.6 


371.2 








4,003.4 


.89 


11.04 


312,2 


2,840.6 


2,593.0 


247,6 








3,905.3 


.73 


11.05 


343.5 


2,872.0 


2,618.0 


254.0 








3,942.5 


.73 


12.01 


357,6 


2,407.7 


2,210.0 


197.7 








3,224.9 


.75 


12.02 


ltl59,9 


9,438.8 


8,507.1 


931.6 








10,531.3 


.90 


13.01 


204,4 


2,444.7 


2,148.4 


296.4 


70.2 


142.9 


587.0 


2,771.6 


.88 


13.02 


103,3 


806.3 


721.6 


84.6 


76.8 


157.7 


474.1 


1 ,041.5 


.77 


13.03 


13,4 


118.2 


103.8 


14.4 


10.0 


20.7 


68.1 


125.4 


.94 


13.01 


4,7 


45.6 


41.4 


4.2 


2.4 


5.2 


18.1 


44.5 


1.02 


13.05 


17,7 


143.7 


127.2 


16.5 


13.1 


27.4 


83.3 


217.7 


.66 


13.06 


25,5 


201.2 


177.0 


24,2 


19.7 


39.0 


123.7 


260.2 


.77 


13.07 


37,4 


319.7 


290.3 


29.4 


22.6 


46.5 


147.9 


412.8 


.77 


14.01 


338,8 


2,469.3 


2,214.7 


254.6 


262.7 


536.9 


1,529.9 


2,879.2 


.86 


10.02 


9,4 


55.6 


50.9 


4,7 


6.4 


13.9 


31.3 


57.2 


.97 


10.03 


22,3 


133.9 


121.6 


12.3 


16.6 


33.9 


80.0 


156.2 


.86 


14.04 


14,0 


103.1 


91.6 


11.5 


10.0 


20.7 


59.3 


342.7 


.30 


14.05 


26,6 


195.1 


174.8 


20.3 


13.8 


27.2 


77.2 


312.9 


.62 


14.06 


176,2 


1,299.9 


1,165.3 


134.6 


60.5 


126.4 


3S6.7 


1,800.1 


.72 


14.07 


16,5 


84.5 


75.2 


9.3 


14.0 


23.6 


54.8 


130.9 


.65 


14.08 


28,8 


198.2 


174.6 


23.6 


22.4 


45.0 


115. 1 


437.2 


.45 


14.09 


110.6 


636.4 


561.0 


75.4 


88.9 


174.0 


376.0 


974.0 


.65 


14.10 


11,6 


71.1 


63.1 


8.0 


9.4 


18.1 


44.0 


120.0 


.59 


14.11 


23,9 


149.4 


134.2 


15.2 


16.2 


31.7 


72.0 


170.8 


.87 


14.12 


22,0 


90.0 


81.3 


8.7 


19.4 


32.8 


60.0 


116.4 


.77 


14.13 


67.8 


364.1 


323.2 


40.9 


56.4 


110.7 


230.4 


583.7 


.62 


14.14 


50,1 


436.9 


384.8 


52.1 


30.4 


64.7 


202.8 


1,055.7 


.41 


14.15 


70,4 


498.9 


453.2 


45.7 


39.8 


86.6 


215.3 


555.3 


.90 


14.16 


4,7 


32.5 


26.8 


3.7 


3.2 


7.2 


15.0 


71.3 


.46 


14.17 


16,8 


167.2 


146.3 


20.9 


9.8 


20.3 


75.2 


289.6 


.58 


14.18 


321,0 


2,317.6 


2,070.9 


246.7 


185.4 


372.2 


1,038.3 


3,516.0 


.66 


14.19 


36,5 


292.5 


258.3 


34.2 


24.9 


53.5 


160.9 


610.2 


.48 


14.20 


86,4 


518.0 


462.4 


55.6 


68.6 


132.4 


312.1 


976.1 


.53 


14.21 


98,1 


952.5 


836.4 


116.1 


61.4 


120.4 


473.2 


4,992.2 


.19 


14.22 


129,8 


872.3 


791.9 


80.3 


46.6 


95.3 


2 1. 9 . 3 


1,249.0 


.70 


14.23 


10,4 


90.2 


81.5 


8.7 


5.5 


11.0 


33.0 


517.5 


.17 


14.24 


5,8 


32.5 


29.0 


3.6 


4.2 


9.4 


17.1 


36.2 


.90 


14.25 


8,8 


69.6 


61.7 


7.9 


5.5 


12.2 


34.4 


161.3 


.43 


14.26 


1,8 


13.4 


12.0 


1.4 


l.« 


3.1 


7.9 


32.3 


.41 


14.27 


14,5 


109.1 


98.6 


10.4 


9.5 


21.7 


58.2 


189.5 


.58 


14.28 


19.4 


169.1 


149.9 


19.3 


9.4 


19.0 


62.1 


558.6 


.30 


14.29 


17,1 


149.4 


132.5 


16.9 


10.5 


22.7 


74.0 


247.8 


.60 


14.30 


8,4 


45.8 


41.8 


4.0 


5.4 


10.4 


23.2 


53.6 


.85 


14.31 


8,0 


53.6 


48.4 


5.2 


5.4 


11.0 


25.4 


92.2 


.58 


14.32 


68,7 


461.2 


416.4 


44,8 


42.9 


83.7 


198.3 


753.6 


.61 


15.01 


66,5 


482.8 


381.4 


101.4 


52.7 


99.3 


257. 9 


3,522.7 


.14 


15.02 


28,7 


158.9 


129.6 


29.4 


22.0 


42.6 


74.3 


341.3 


.47 


16.01 


459,7 


2,601.7 


2,376.4 


2?5.3 


391.3 


828.7 


1,787.7 


3,645.5 


.71 


16.02 


26,7 


137.5 


124.8 


12.7 


23.3 


46.7 


96.3 


210.0 


.65 


16.03 


123,7 


601.0 


546.6 


54.4 


110.5 


224.0 


4«0.4 


836.9 


.72 


16.04 


11.8 


58.2 


52.6 


5.6 


10.0 


19.2 


38.7 


95.3 


.61 


17.01 


47,3 


290.4 


262.5 


?7. o 


36.0 


77.0 


165.4 


497.9 


.58 


17.02 


4,6 


30.7 


27.8 


2.9 


3.6 


7.7 


19.1 


55.8 


.55 


17.03 


5,1 


27.0 


24.7 


2.3 


4.4 


8.4 


19.5 


30.9 


.87 


17.04 


6,7 


42.5 


37.7 


4.8 


5.3 


10.7 


26.1 


59.0 


.72 






Appendix Table 5 
Employment, Compensation, and Related Measures, by 367-Industry 1-0 Detail 

- continued - 



1967 





All employees 


Production workers 


Value 




Indus- 


Employ- 
ment 


Compen- 
sation 


Wages and 
salaries 


Supple- 
ments 


Comp. 


try 


Number 


Hours 


Wages 


to VA 


number 


(000) 


(mil.$) 


(mil.$) 


(mil.$) 


(000) 


(mil.) 


(mil.$) 


added 


ratio 


17.05 


4.6 


23.5 


21.5 


2.0 


3.9 


8.0 


15.4 


20.0 


1.17 


17.06 


18.0 


142.4 


128.1 


14.4 


12.7 


26.9 


78.1 


225.6 


.63 


17.07 


10.4 


58.5 


51.5 


7.0 


9.2 


18.4 


41.7 


64.7 


.90 


17.08 


6,2 


36.1 


32.5 


3.6 


5.3 


10.8 


25.0 


93.7 


.39 


17.09 


10,5 


56.8 


51.0 


5.8 


8.7 


17.2 


36.3 


81.3 


.70 


17.10 


10,4 


69.2 


63.4 


5.9 


7.6 


15.3 


33.8 


101.8 


.68 


IS. 01 


98,8 


415.7 


379.9 


35.8 


88.2 


163.7 


304.1 


539.3 


.77 


IS. 02 


109,8 


537.9 


489.3 


48,7 


94.1 


176.7 


359.5 


683.9 


.79 


16.03 


36,9 


222.1 


202.5 


19.6 


30.7 


65.5 


145.6 


328.5 


.68 


18. 04 


1.232.1 


5.606.2 


5.113.9 


492.3 


1.064.0 


1.918.6 


3,793.7 


6.811.4 


.82 


1<J.01 


26,3 


113.1 


104.7 


8.5 


22.7 


42.6 


78.1 


145.8 


.78 


19.02 


47,5 


223.6 


206.4 


17,2 


39.3 


76.4 


144.5 


270.3 


.83 


19.05 


102,2 


562.2 


502.5 


59.7 


87.7 


165.0 


371.8 


835.5 


.67 


20.01 


71.4 


379.9 


345.6 


34.2 


67.5 


125.9 


306.8 


1.183.3 


.32 


20.02 


185,0 


1.025.6 


924.9 


100.7 


1o4.7 


322.7 


754.8 


1.399.5 


.73 


20.03 


28,6 


131.3 


119.7 


11.6 


25.2 


51.5 


94.4 


152.2 


.86 


20. OU 


7.4 


33.1 


30.4 


2.7 


6.7 


10.9 


25.4 


56.8 


.58 


20. OS 


66.5 


425.1 


388.4 


36.7 


53.9 


106.6 


274.1 


573.9 


.74 


20.06 


76,0 


504.4 


450.4 


54.0 


66.2 


138.4 


361.9 


612.1 


.82 


20.07 


17,1 


122.8 


111.6 


11.2 


11.9 


23.8 


61.2 


155.0 


.79 


20.08 


12,5 


70.7 


63.8 


6.9 


10.3 


21. 7 


47.1 


123.0 


.58 


20.09 


71,5 


381.3 


347.3 


34.0 


61.0 


119.9 


255.4 


589.7 


.65 


21.00 


31,8 


152.4 


138.0 


14,4 


28.3 


55.6 


109.5 


219.6 


.69 


22.01 


164.0 


864.5 


784.2 


80.3 


142.3 


289.1 


593.7 


1 .178.2 


.73 


22.02 


76,8 


428.5 


390.8 


37.7 


64.8 


125.9 


287.0 


556.6 


.77 


22.03 


31,7 


177.8 


161.8 


16.0 


25.8 


50.3 


109.6 


247.5 


.72 


22.04 


32.0 


196.8 


179.8 


17.1 


24.4 


47.8 


MO. 7 


287.2 


.69 


23.01 


8,4 


53.3 


48.3 


5.0 


6.9 


14.3 


35.6 


74.0 


.72 


23.02 


27,9 


311.2 


187.2 


24.0 


21.1 


42.9 


125.3 


328.3 


.64 


23.03 


23,2 


153.3 


137.2 


16.0 


17.5 


36.3 


89.2 


209.4 


.73 


23.04 


25,7 


191.0 


174.3 


16.7 


20.7 


40.9 


124.1 


237.4 


.80 


23.05 


23,2 


175.5 


158.1 


17.5 


17.0 


35.1 


96.0 


242.7 


.72 


23.06 


11,9 


71.7 


64.1 


7.7 


8.6 


15.9 


37.7 


100.2 


.72 


23.07 


10,3 


66.3 


60.9 


5.4 


8.4 


17.2 


44.8 


85.7 


.77 


24.01 


15,4 


14S.4 


130.7 


14.7 


12.2 


25.4 


96.0 


250.7 


.58 


24.02 


151,9 


1.421.3 


1.264.2 


157.0 


112.3 


249.2 


849.2 


2.055.6 


.69 


24.03 


72,3 


671.3 


597.7 


73.6 


53.8 


118.2 


405.9 


1.314.2 


.51 


24.04 


24,6 


181.8 


163.1 _ 


18.7 


18.1 


37.6 


98.0 


209.6 


.87 


24.05 


23,9 


197.4 


176.7 


20.7 


18.3 


37.6 


119.2 


477.6 


.41 


24.06 


15,3 


124.0 


110.1 


13.9 


11.8 


25.1 


77.3 


182.6 


.68 


24.07 


152,7 


1.121.6 


1.011.4 


110.2 


108.6 


220.0 


592.1 


1.723.8 


.65 


25.00 


225.8 


1.625.9 


1.461.5 


164.3 


172.6 


358.2 


967.9 


2.227.1 


.73 


26.01 


342,5 


2.516.1 


2.295.0 


221.1 


169.2 


302.0 


1.121.5 


3.215.5 


.78 


26.02 


85,5 


761.1 


692.9 


68.2 


14.5 


25.2 


80.5 


1.153.1 


.66 


26.03 


104,9 


832.6 


755.8 


76.8 


49.9 


98.1 


30«.5 


1.184.3 


.70 


26.04 


34,4 


238.0 


218.2 


19,8 


15.0 


25.6 


79.7 


385.6 


.62 


26.05 


327,3 


2.555.6 


2.358.7 


197.1 


254.5 


496.5 


1 .646,6 


3.210.3 


.80 


26.06 


62,7 


462.4 


419.3 


43.1 


44.7 


89.8 


?53.4 


743.2 


.62 


26.07 


29,2 


185.0 


164.5 


20,5 


16.4 


31.3 


75.0 


297.2 


.62 


26.08 


83,3 


651.2 


605.4 


45,8 


67.4 


127.6 


450.1 


818.0 


.80 


27.01 


297,4 


2.971.2 


2.618.9 


352.3 


154.? 


314.0 


1.173.3 


6.294.5 


.47 


27.02 


36,6 


249.6 


223.2 


26.4 


24.1 


50.0 


123.6 


518.2 


.48 


27.03 


12,9 


106.4 


95.2 


11.3 


6.9 


13.6 


39.0 


298.2 


.36 


27.04 


105,3 


869.7 


778.2 


"51,5 


64.4 


130.1 


390.2 


1.299.4 


.67 


28.01 


89,9 


906.2 


800.9 


105.2 


46.8 


95.6 


332.7 


1.167.5 


.78 


28.02 


15,6 


174.3 


151.4 


22.9 


8.5 


16.8 


66.5 


328.3 


.53 


28.03 


40,0 


317.9 


275.2 


42.8 


25.3 


50.0 


141.1 


404.0 


.79 


28.04 


71,5 


664.7 


575.5 


89.2 


40.7 


80.9 


257.9 


1.038.7 


.64 


29.01 


148,9 


1.418.9 


1.258.4 


160.5 


65.6 


128.2 


405.1 


2.797.4 


.51 


29.02 


70.7 


657.4 


582.4 


75.0 


34.9 


69.0 


222. « 


1.436.4 


.46 


29.03 


45,5 


343.9 


307.1 


36.8 


26.4 


50.2 


125.0 


607.4 


.57 


30.00 


72,8 


622.4 


557.7 


64,7 


36.3 


73.1 


223.4 


945.6 


.66 


31.01 


170,4 


2.190.7 


1.659.4 


531.3 


80.4 


161.2 


661.8 


6.401.3 


.34 


31.02 


17,6 


193.0 


149.0 


43.9 


8.5 


18.0 


56.4 


234.3 


.82 


31.03 


20,4 


207.7 


160.8 


47.0 


10.4 


22.9 


66.2 


228.0 


.91 


32.01 


108,3 


1.083.1 


925.9 


157,2 


71.4 


136.5 


573.8 


1.922.5 


.56 


32.02 


29,6 


168.2 


145.0 


23.2 


25.7 


46.5 


112.8 


202.3 


.83 


32.03 


145,8 


1.102.1 


960.7 


141.4 


109.0 


217.6 


627.2 


1.474.0 


.75 


32.04 


255,2 


1.637.5 


1.469.3 


168.2 


204.0 


414.9 


998.7 


2.592.6 


.63 


33.00 


34,0 


232.6 


208.2 


24.4 


26.4 


56.8 


152.9 


323.4 


.72 


34.01 


13,9 


66.5 


61.1 


5.4 


12.2 


22.7 


45.8 


94.0 


.71 


34.02 


221,3 


1.062.4 


962.3 


1 00.1 


191.0 


354.2 


720.8 


1.348.4 


.79 


34.03 


71,5 


345.7 


314.6 


31.1 


61.7 


115.5 


227.5 


394.4 


.88 


35.01 


105,5 


843.0 


745.6 


97. S 


80.2 


159.8 


503.9 


1.330.0 


.63 


35.02 


74,9 




566.4 


506.8 


59.6 


59.4 


119.4 


362.3 


782.8 


.72 



34 



Appendix Table 5 
Employment, Compensation, and Related Measures, by 367-Industry 1-0 Detail 

- continued - 



1967 





All employees 


Production workers 


Value 




Indus- 


Employ- 
ment 


Compen- 
sation 


Wages and 
salaries 


Supple- 
ments 


Comp. 


try 


Number 


Hours 


Wages 


to VA 


number 


(000) 


(mil.$) 


(mil.$) 


(mil .$) 


(000) 


(mil.) 


(■11.$) 


added 


ratio 


36.01 


37.3 


348.5 


300.5 


48,n 


26.2 


52.5 


184.4 


652.1 


.53 


36.02 


28,3 


165.5 


150.3 


15.2 


23.3 


47.9 


109.8 


213.9 


.77 


36.03 


11.1 


72.8 


65.6 


7.3 


8.S 


17.6 


41.8 


61.6 


.69 


36.04 


13,1 


101.6 


89.6 


12.0 


10.1 


19.2 


59.2 


117.6 


.86 


36.05 


10,1 


66.1 


58.5 


7.6 


8.1 


16.5 


42.9 


87.1 


.76 


36.06 


8.5 


64.6 


57.6 


7.0 


7.0 


13.8 


45.7 


109.7 


.59 


36.07 


13,1 


72.4 


65.1 


7.3 


11.3 


21.0 


49.9 


81.1 


.89 


36. OS 


13,6 


104.5 


91.8 


12.7 


11.0 


22.2 


67.5 


148.9 


.70 


36.09 


8,2 


44.2 


40.0 


4.2 


6.7 


13.1 


27.0 


53.7 


.82 


36.10 


21,7 


147.5 


135.3 


12.3 


14.6 


30.6 


77.0 


230.2 


.64 


36.11 


59,4 


413.4 


374.2 


39,2 


45.4 


94.2 


247.9 


623.1 


.66 


36.12 


77,4 


593.7 


538.9 


54.8 


49.2 


100.7 


3Q8.6 


880.1 


.67 


36.13 


7.3 


52.9 


47.0 


5.8 


5.7 


12.0 


33.4 


95.9 


.55 


36.14 


11,4 


94.3 


85.8 


8.5 


7.8 


17.5 


52.2 


198.0 


.48 


36. IS 


17,2 


104.9 


96.2 


8.7 


14.1 


28.3 


70.9 


132.1 


.79 


36.16 


29,2 


251.0 


220.1 


30.9 


18.9 


36.3 


HO. 2 


347.2 


.72 


36.17 


a3,8 


193.3 


170.5 


22.8 


16.8 


35.0 


107.5 


264.5 


.68 


36.16 


19.6 


139.6 


125.7 


14.0 


14.1 


27.8 


76.8 


176.2 


.79 


36.19 


9.3 


72.5 


64.3 


8.2 


7.0 


14.4 


41.7 


110.5 


.66 


36.20 


16,7 


137.0 


124.0 


13.1 


12.2 


25.5 


83.9 


227.7 


.60 


36.21 


10,6 


90.4 


79.7 


10.7 


7.4 


14.8 


49.5 


141.4 


.64 


36.22 


5,5 


36.1 


32.7 


3.5 


4.3 


8.3 


21.1 


47.1 


.77 


37.01 


658,0 


6,473.2 


5,495.0 


978.2 


500.8 


981.6 


3,8?9.2 


9,169.7 


.71 


37.02 


241,1 


1,999.3 


1,732.5 


266.8 


198.3 


402.1 


1,306.7 


2,396.7 


.83 


37.03 


42.8 


419.0 


365.8 


53.2 


33.4 


67.2 


265.6 


548.2 


.76 


37.04 


27,2 


228.5 


204.8 


23.7 


19.7 


41.4 


124.5 


308.7 


.74 


36.01 


12,2 


102.9 


67.5 


15.4 


9.2 


18.1 


61.0 


152.5 


.67 


36.02 


2,8 


23.5 


20.5 


3.0 


2.1 


4.3 


13.3 


34.5 


.68 


38.03 


8,6 


73.3 


63.5 


9.8 


6.4 


13.5 


42.9 


92.7 


.79 


38.04 


33,7 


320.6 


2eo.5 


40.1 


26.5 


53.0 


200.2 


664.8 


.37 


36.05 


7,6 


71.0 


62.4 


6.6 


5.2 


11.2 


38.1 


112.4 


.63 


36.06 


17.8 


147.0 


130.1 


16.8 


12.8 


26.6 


78.4 


215.1 


.68 


38.07 


42,9 


374.6 


322.9 


51.7 


32.2 


64.5 


2l9.0 


645.2 


.58 


38.06 


68,0 


634.0 


552.2 


81.9 


48.7 


101.0 


354.9 


869.5 


.73 


38.09 


23,5 


215.7 


188.0 


27.7 


14.6 


30.9 


100.4 


361.3 


.60 


36.10 


75.8 


617.8 


546.5 


71,3 


55.3 


117.0 


352.7 


1,394.1 


.44 


36.11 


47,9 


385.4 


341.6 


43.7 


38.8 


78.8 


243.6 


457.7 


.84 


38.12 


19,5 


150.3 


135.2 


15.1 


15.1 


30.6 


89.2 


194.6 


.77 


38.13 


26,0 


214.4 


190.6 


23.6 


22.1 


45.0 


131.2 


282.7 


.76 


36.14 


10.7 


107.3 


95.4 


11.9 


7.4 


16.5 


61.4 


108.2 


.99 


39.01 


69,9 


673.7 


577.8 


95.9 


52.3 


112.7 


393.3 


1 ,045.2 


.64 


39.02 


11,9 


98.5 


87.1 


11.4 


9.t 


19.4 


59.9 


127.6 


.77 


40.01 


11.1 


91.7 


62.1 


9.6 


8.1 


16.4 


53.5 


114.5 


.80 


40.02 


16,1 


122.0 


109.0 


13.0 


11.4 


22.8 


64.2 


145.5 


.64 


40.03 


43,5 


330.5 


294.5 


36.1 


29.0 


57.5 


160.7 


416.4 


.79 


40.04 


105,5 


663.6 


766.8 


96.8 


80.1 


163.6 


509.9 


1 ,094.6 


.79 


40.05 


64,8 


431.3 


388.4 


42,9 


47.9 


94.8 


235.7 


499.9 


.B6 


40.06 


89,3 


736.1 


652.8 


83.3 


73.1 


150.4 


477.5 


1,068.2 


.69 


40.07 


63,3 


510.0 


456.4 


53.5 


52.9 


105.8 


336.0 


712.9 


.72 


40.08 


19.1 


135.4 


122.7 


12.8 


15.4 


29.5 


81.5 


188.0 


.72 


40.09 


32,1 


247.9 


218.9 


29.1 


23.2 


47.4 


137.4 


383.8 


.65 


41.01 


118.7 


978.7 


877.0 


101.7 


93.7 


196.7 


605.7 


1,457.5 


.67 


41.02 


229,7 


1,990.8 


1,733.0 


257.7 


187.0 


379.8 


1.272.4 


2,813.9 


.71 


42.01 


13,5 


97.4 


85.2 


12.2 


10.4 


20.5 


54.5 


208.0 


.47 


42.02 


43,8 


327.1 


292.2 


34.9 


33.5 


68.0 


195.3 


534.7 


.61 


42.03 


104,7 


824.4 


726.8 


97.6 


80.0 


171.4 


492.4 


1,281.5 


.64 


42.04 


82.2 


535.7 


489.7 


46.0 


69.0 


137.4 


356.0 


773.0 


.69 


42.05 


61,6 


419.4 


376.5 


42.9 


49.3 


99.0 


257.2 


574.8 


.73 


42.06 


3.9 


31.3 


27.7 


3.6 


2.6 


4.9 


16.4 


49.7 


.63 


42.07 


7,9 


63.8 


56.2 


7.6 


6.2 


12.6 


39.8 


80.6 


.79 


42.06 


116,9 


949.8 


849.1 


100.6 


81.2 


166.4 


516.4 


1,435.1 


.66 


42.09 


4.4 


27.4 


24.6 


2.9 


3.9 


7.6 


18.7 


32.1 


.85 


42.10 


6,8 


56.7 


51.1 


5.7 


4.8 


10.3 


31.1 


99.6 


.57 


42.11 


42,5 


302.0 


271.8 


30.3 


32.8 


66.0 


176.1 


458.9 


.6b 


43.01 


39,1 


390.8 


350.4 


40.5 


24.6 


49.9 


195.6 


494. -J 


.79 


43.02 


66.5 


613.2 


531.7 


61.5 


47.5 


97.2 


344.6 


890.4 


.69 


44.00 


152,0 


1,276.3 


1,106.3 


170.1 


104.0 


203.2 


662.3 


1.716.3 


.74 


45.01 


139.9 


1,221.7 


1,061.7 


160.0 


98.6 


193.9 


673.4 


1.859.7 


.66 


45.02 


22,8 


1P8.7 


168.3 


20.4 


14.9 


29.7 


95.8 


264.2 


.71 


45.03 


34,3 


290.9 


257.2 


33.7 


21.7 


46.1 


143.4 


436.3 


.67 


46.01 


13.7 


121.4 


107.6 


13.8 


8.8 


18.1 


*3.4 


143.9 


.84 


46.02 


29.1 


258.8 


231.9 


26.9 


16.8 


35.0 


112.0 


332.6 


.78 


46.03 


17,6 


160.5 


143.9 


16.7 


11.6 


24.1 


88.0 


192.1 


.84 


46.04 


28,4 


238.9 


214.2 


24.8 


17.7 


36.5 


H5.6 


335.2 


.71 


47.01 


89,9 


883.2 


790.8 


92.4 


60.5 


131.8 


476.5 


1.216.4 


.73 



35 



Appendix Table 5 
Employment, Compensation, and Related Measures, by 367-Industry 1-0 Detail, 1967 

- continued - 





All employees 


Production workers 


Value 




Indus- 


Employ- 
ment 


Compen- 
sation 


Wages and 
salaries 


Supple- 
ments 


Comp. 


try 


Number 


Hours 


Wages 


to VA 


number 


(000) 


(mil.$) 


(mil.$) 


(mil .$) 


(000) 


(mil.) 


(mil .$) 


added 


ratio 


17.02 


30.3 


292.6 


261.6 


31.0 


20.9 


46.2 


165.0 


364.8 


.80 


07.03 


176,5 


1,698.9 


1,546.2 


152,8 


140.7 


310.6 


1,124.2 


2,266.9 


.75 


47.04 


48.5 


398.6 


356.0 


42.6 


34.0 


69.4 


218.8 


589.J 


.68 


48.01 


33,7 


289.3 


261.4 


27.9 


22.0 


45.2 


147.2 


437.7 


.66 


48.02 


ai.3 


298.5 


267.6 


30.9 


29.4 


62.5 


169.1 


323.2 


.92 


48.03 


13.7 


104.3 


93.6 


10.8 


8.8 


17.6 


50.4 


153.3 


.68 


48.04 


22.4 


205.6 


185.1 


20.5 


14.6 


31.1 


111. 6 


213.9 


.96 


48.05 


31,0 


289.1 


259.0 


30.1 


20.1 


42.2 


149.2 


387.9 


.75 


46.06 


75,8 


692.0 


619.8 


72.2 


46.1 


97.8 


323.0 


889.0 


.78 


49.01 


79.9 


689.9 


613.2 


76.8 


49.8 


104.6 


335.3 


t.029.2 


.67 


49.02 


61,6 


560.0 


487.7 


72.3 


47.5 


100.9 


343.5 


725.7 


.77 


49.03 


21,8 


176.3 


158.0 


18,3 


14.9 


31.5 


93.2 


250.7 


.70 


49.04 


11,0 


119.0 


108.3 


10.7 


9.5 


19.4 


86.7 


143.0 


.83 


49.05 


56,9 


489.5 


432.3 


57.1 


40.6 


83.4 


273.6 


715.8 


.68 


49.06 


16,6 


148.3 


135.1 


13.2 


8.9 


18.3 


58.2 


200.2 


.74 


49.07 


41,0 


347.6 


312.7 


34,9 


25.4 


52.3 


163.2 


431.9 


.80 


50.00 


206,3 


1,623.5 


1,479.2 


144.3 


169.9 


348.5 


1,100.1 


2,222.6 


.73 


51.01 


154,4 


1,451.8 


1,312.6 


139.1 


62.0 


162.8 


534.3 


1,784.8 


.81 


51.02 


30,2 


237.9 


215.8 


22.1 


19.9 


39.3 


116.6 


399.5 


.60 


51.03 


7,1 


59.4 


52.7 


6,7 


4.3 


8.5 


24.0 


79.6 


.75 


51.04 


23,9 


202.7 


182.2 


20.5 


13.5 


26.6 


82.1 


290.7 


.70 


52.01 


10,4 


70.5 


62.4 


6.1 


7.8 


14.8 


3 < ». 6 


97.7 


.72 


52.02 


7,7 


58.7 


53.3 


5.3 


5.4 


11.2 


32.5 


76.6 


.77 


52.03 


99,3 


776.6 


686.8 


89.8 


69.6 


141.0 


423.9 


1,209.0 


.64 


52.04 


6,7 


54.3 


46.5 


5,8 


4.3 


8.9 


25.1 


75.5 


.72 


52.05 


22,0 


178.7 


162.0 


16.7 


13.5 


27.2 


82.4 


244.1 


.73 


53.01 


72,4 


608.8 


540.6 


68.2 


40.4 


78.7 


222.3 


669.6 


.91 


53.02 


55,1 


466.3 


419.5 


46,7 


34.0 


68.5 


210.1 


593.5 


.79 


53.03 


81,5 


703.4 


629.2 


74.2 


49.7 


100.5 


304.9 


685.6 


.79 


53.04 


118,5 


921.9 


821.0 


100.9 


85.3 


172.3 


514.4 


1,237.5 


.74 


53.05 


53,4 


427.2 


381.3 


46,0 


34.8 


69.6 


210.7 


621.5 


.69 


53.06 


14,1 


136.8 


123.2 


13.5 


9.4 


19.8 


72.9 


223.0 


.61 


53.07 


12.2 


98.3 


86.2 


12.1 


9.1 


18.5 


57.8 


160.3 


.61 


53.08 


18,4 , 


120.9 


107.8 


13.1 


14.0 


27.4 


69.2 


160.5 


.75 


54.01 


21.4 


155.9 


138.5 


17.3 


16.0 


31.3 


88.7 


185.7 


.84 


54.02 


55.9 


474.2 


411.6 


62.4 


43.9 


84.5 


290.2 


649.2 


.73 


54.03 


23,4 


189.8 


167.8 


22.0 


17.8 


33.7 


U3.8 


321. S 


.59 


54.04 


46,9 


291.3 


261.3 


30.0 


35.5 


69.1 


161.0 


397.2 


.73 


54.05 


9,7 


70.8 


64.0 


6.8 


7.1 


13.2 


39.6 


154.7 


.46 


54.06 


6,7 


59.2 


53.4 


5.8 


4.9 


9.7 


34.7 


71.1 


.83 


54.07 


14,0 


110.4 


98.1 


12.3 


10.0 


20.6 


60.1 


166.9 


.66 


55.01 


32,3 


224.9 


196.2 


28.7 


25.8 


49.9 


136.0 


488.3 


.46 


55.02 


67,5 


465.9 


416.7 


49.3 


50.0 


98.8 


252.6 


685.4 


.68 


55.03 


67.7 


491.9 


439.1 


52.8 


47.3 


93.6 


253.3 


754.5 


.65 


56.01 


136.0 


976.7 


859.8 


116.8 


96.2 


183.4 


462.6 


tr217.3 


.80 


56.02 


15,7 


114.2 


100.9 


13.3 


11.0 


22.2 


54.0 


110.3 


1.04 


56.03 


118.6 


979.6 


867.4 


112.2 


83.2 


158.8 


534.4 


t,498.4 


.65 


56.04 


419,6 


4,116.3 


3,709.8 


406.5 


221.3 


447.6 


1,515.6 


5,001.2 


.82 


57.01 


73.3 


574.2 


508.2 


66.0 


50.5 


98.5 


277.3 


790.4 


.73 


57.02 


93.2 


702.5 


629.8 


72.7 


57.9 


118.1 


307.3 


679.5 


1.03 


57.03 


272,7 


1,854.4 


1,663.5 


190.9 


185.0 


359.6 


864.3 


2,183.9 


.85 


58.01 


20,8 


167.2 


146.4 


20.8 


15.2 


30.6 


97.7 


225.9 


.74 


58.02 


11.7 


74.4 


65.7 


8.7 


8.9 


17.6 


43.2 


162.0 


.46 


58.03 


8.3 


74.2 


67.7 


6.5 


4.3 


8.7 


26.3 


111.3 


.67 


58.04 


58,7 


482.0 


416.9 


65.1 


44.2 


86.3 


286.8 


701.0 


.69 


58.05 


14,6 


86.0 


77.7 


8.4 


11.1 


20.2 


45.2 


108.1 


.80 


59.01 


33,1 


237.3 


217.8 


19.5 


24.6 


49.4 


138.5 


250.0 


.95 


59.02 


24.6 


181.6 


163.0 


18.6 


18.3 


35.5 


105.1 


225.6 


.80 


59.03 


791,3 


8,045.0 


6,768.4 


1,276.6 


572.5 


1,154.0 


4,4*8.9 


12,984.7 


.62 


60.01 


397,8 


4,173.7 


3,714.4 


459.3 


230.6 


469.9 


1,806.7 


4,544.2 


.92 


60.02 


202,6 


2,115.6 


1,871.9 


243.7 


112.6 


245.8 


875.2 


2,447.4 


.86 


60.03 


9.4 


85.6 


74.5 


11.1 


6.0 


11.9 


42.3 


24.7 


3.47 


60.04 


218,6 


2,114.9 


1,885.0 


229,9 


140.1 


300.0 


1,068.7 


2,478.9 


.85 


61.01 


140,3 


1,219.8 


1,095.7 


124.1 


114.2 


231.0 


819.4 


1,213.9 


1.00 


61.02 


30,9 


183.4 


166.6 


16.7 


26.2 


51.8 


128.1 


229.0 


.80 


61.03 


17.4 


172.8 


149.7 


23.1 


H.7 


23.5 


90.8 


297.1 


.58 


61.04 


54.0 


467.8 


406.0 


61.8 


40.0 


76.8 


272.9 


495.5 


.94 


61.05 


12.2 


81.0 


72.6 


8.2 


10.1 


19.1 


53.4 


114.2 


.71 


61.06 


44,4 


275.4 


245.3 


30.1 


37.4 


73.1 


180.3 


374.9 


.73 


61.07 


11.4 


69.0 


62.3 


6.7 


9.4 


16.4 


43.8 


88.6 


.78 


62.01 


46,9 


372.2 


337.9 


34.3 


31.4 


64.0 


191.2 


491.8 


.76 


62.02 


72.5 


579.3 


526.1 


53.2 


45.9 


89.9 


268.9 


748.5 


.77 


62.03 


33,1 


253.7 


228.3 


25.4 


22.6 


45.2 


131.1 


342.7 


.74 


62.04 


23,2 


166.4 


150.2 


16.2 


16.4 


32.8 


83.5 


245.3 


.68 


62.05 


36.6 


257.8 


232.9 


24.9 


24.6 


48.0 


125.7 


415.6 


.62 



36' - 



Appendix Table 5 
Employment, Compensation, and Related Measures, by 367-Industry 1-0 Detail, 1967 

- continued - 







All empl 


oyees 




Production workers 


Value 




Indus- 


Employ- 
ment 


Compen- 
sation 


wages and 
salaries 


Supple- 
ments 


Comp. 


try 


Number 


Hours 


Wages 


to VA 


number 


(000) 


(mil .$) 


(mil .$) 


(mil .$) 


(000) 


(mil.) 


(mil.$) 


added 


ratio 


62.06 


10,6 


78.4 


70.8 


7.6 


7.3 


14.3 


38.3 


114.5 


.69 


62.07 


36.2 


245.3 


219.0 


26.3 


27.6 


55.2 


139.5 


299.1 


.82 


63.01 


21,5 


188. 8 


171.7 


17,1 


13.2 


27.6 


86.1 


222.2 


.85 


63.02 


26,9 


170.8 


154.1 


16.6 


20.7 


41.1 


103. 4 


229.6 


.74 


63.03 


104,1 


1,052.2 


925.9 


126.3 


56.2 


112.1 


401 .3 


2.268.5 


.46 


64.01 


87,9 


565.4 


517.6 


47,8 


71.1 


136.7 


337.3 


837.3 


.68 


64.02 


25,8 


168.9 


152.9 


16.0 


20.8 


39.9 


1 06.0 


169.9 


.99 


64.03 


72.8 


387.3 


348.3 


39.0 


59.9 


111.4 


226.3 


532.7 


.73 


64.04 


46,6 


265.8 


240.8 


25,0 


37.? 


72.0 


160.0 


414.5 


.64 


64.05 


36,0 


233.5 


212.5 


21.0 


25.4 


50.2 


1 16.3 


334.2 


.70 


64.06 


5,3 


22.7 


20.7 


2.0 


4.6 


7.9 


14.8 


35.7 


.63 


64.07 


24,9 


148.4 


132.8 


15.7 


20.0 


39.8 


87.3 


227.7 


.65 


64.08 


17,7 


102.2 


92.1 


10.1 


14.1 


26.8 


61.5 


152.9 


.67 


64.09 


6,3 


52.6 


47.3 


5.3 


4.9 


10.1 


33.2 


111.4 


.47 


64.10 


16,6 


105.8 


96.0 


9.8 


13.0 


26.4 


60.6 


119.0 


.89 


64.11 


48,6 


347.0 


317.4 


29, h 


36.8 


70.6 


198.8 


439. a 


.79 


64.12 


54,5 


311.9 


284.4 


27,5 


43.1 


81.7 


184.6 


409.4 


.76 


O5.01 


611.2 


5.564.0 


4,895.8 


668.2 








8,537.9 


.65 


65.02 


282,7 


1.720.8 


1,567.0 


153,8 








2,763.3 


.62 


65.03 


1 ,028,6 


7,883.3 


7,152.8 


730,5 








11,183.6 


.70 


65.04 


240,1 


2,054.4 


1,866.3 


188,1 








2,568.0 


.80 


65.05 


297,4 


2,924.8 


2,632.3 


292.5 








4.653.4 


.63 


65.06 


11.8 


118.1 


106.6 


11,5 








813.6 


.15 


65.07 


94,2 


695.5 


616.5 


79,0 








849.8 


.82 


66.00 


825,8 


6,820.3 


5,652.7 


1.167.6 








16.022.1 


.43 


67.00 


118,9 


1,060.2 


971.3 


88.9 








1.582.2 


.67 


68.01 


289,5 


2,717.4 


2,364.7 


352.8 








11.141.0 


.24 


68.02 


220,3 


1.837.4 


1,598.8 


238,5 








*. 292.5 


.35 


68.03 


30,7 


345.6 


300.7 


44.9 








853.7 


.40 


69.01 


3.130,8 


26,070.8 


24,088.1 


1 .982.7 








43. 798. P 


.60 


69.02 


lOt 137,2 


44,215.3 


40,866.9 


3.348.5 








75.406. 1 


.59 


70.01 


869,2 


5,9?0.4 


5,088.2 


832,2 








11,744.2 


.50 


70.02 


378,9 


2,596.4 


2.293.3 


303.1 








-872.1 





70.03 


156,0 


1,999.7 


1,851.7 


148,0 








3.638.1 


.55 


70.04 


959,2 


7,128.4 


6,317.0 


811.4 








8.480.5 


.84 


70.05 


250,9 


1,734.4 


1,582.5 


151.9 








3.474.0 


.50 


71.01 


,0 


.0 


.0 


.0 








43, 270.fc 


.00 


71.02 


443,3 


1.715.2 


lt571.2 


144.0 








39.763.«? 


.04 


72.01 


430,7 


1,461.5 


1.3U3.5 


118,0 








2,72«.l 


.54 


72.02 


901,3 


4,107.8 


3.832.9 


274.9 








6,889.? 


.60 


72.03 


324,6 


1,357.6 


1.266.4 


91.2 








2,818.1 


.48 


73.01 


1.627.8 


9,900.2 


9. 149.6 


750.6 








15,040.5 


.66 


73.02 


117.6 


1,158.6 


1.069.8 


88,9 








1,591.9 


.73 


73.03 


t>39,7 


5.039.5 


4.720.4 


319,1 








12,158.8 


.41 


75.00 


722,4 


3,804.4 


3.539.8 


264.6 








8,105.3 


.47 


76.01 


181, S 


1,127.7 


1.050.7 


77.0 








1 ,522.3 


.74 


76.02 


381,2 


1.925.7 


1.784.6 


141,1 








3,498.0 


.55 


77.01 


445.1 


2.110.0 


1.9*0.5 


159.5 








10,938.1 


.19 


77.02 


1,415,2 


7,024.8 


6.493.7 


531,2 








7,139.6 


.98 


77.03 


385,3 


1,521.5 


1.406.5 


115.0 








2,917.3 


.52 


77.04 


1.029,8 


4,812.1 


4,474.5 


337.6 








5,200.6 


.93 


77.05 


1.749,7 


7,824.1 


7.333.8 


490.? 








7,944.0 


.98 


78.01 


713,3 


5,034.1 


4,662.8 


371.3 








3,998.0 


1 .26 


78.02 


12,1 


123.5 


114.4 


9.1 








333.5 


.37 


78.03 


2,3 


20.9 


19.4 


1.5 








-506.0 





78.04 


148,0 


600.6 


5*6.3 


44,3 








1,215.7 


.U9 


79.01 


81,2 


674.5 


625.0 


49,5 








600.5 


1.12 


79.02 


44,2 


270.7 


250.9 


19,8 








1 ,182.6 


.23 


79.03 


201,7 


1,103.6 


973.9 


129.7 








3,068.7 


.36 


85.00 


-5,0 


57.0 


57.0 


.0 








4.561 .0 


.01 


86.00 


2.527.0 


4,701.0 


4.640.0 


61.0 








4.701.0 


1 .00 


97.10 


5.823,5 


27,115.5 


25.807.8 


1.307.7 








27,115.5 


1 .00 


97.20 


731,3 


8,032.8 


7.418.4 


614.4 








8,032.8 


1.00 


98.60 


4,603,3 


27,066.8 


24.415.1 


2.651.7 








27, 066. « 


1.00 


98.70 


1.139,2 


6,830.8 


6.082.2 


748.6 








6.830.P 


1 .00 


98.80 


633,7 


5,256.6 


4.745.1 


51 1.5 








5,256,6 


1.00 


98.90 


1.562,9 


7,681.3 




6.791.2 


890.1 








7.681 .3 


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